BL: Boxing Day
Posted: 22 December 2015 09:10 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Having nothing whatsoever to do with pugilism

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Posted: 22 December 2015 04:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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When living in London, there were several times that I received letters sent from the US that were simply addressed to My Name, London England, followed with the proper post code. One day I ran into the postman and asked him how it was that I received such minimally addressed letters.

“The post code puts it into my route and I recognized your name, so I knew where they went.”

He got a bottle of Bells on Boxing Day.

Which leads me to the question… is it still a common practice to give such presents on Boxing Day?

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Posted: 22 December 2015 05:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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happydog - 22 December 2015 04:19 PM

When living in London, there were several times that I received letters sent from the US that were simply addressed to My Name, London England, followed with the proper post code. One day I ran into the postman and asked him how it was that I received such minimally addressed letters.

“The post code puts it into my route and I recognized your name, so I knew where they went.”

He got a bottle of Bells on Boxing Day.

Which leads me to the question… is it still a common practice to give such presents on Boxing Day?

Well, for your last question, here in Holland it used to be more accepted a decade or two back to give the postman or delivery boys of free papers a bit extra at Xmas, but nowadays that’s all been cut back to a minimum as margins only count for independent post companies.

As a part-time postie myself (for fitness and the rent) I can relate to the comments re postcode and name. I will always go the extra mile on that kind of thing but you can’t deliver everything that is badly addressed. Still, a bottle of 70proof wouldn’nt be a bad thank you!  :thumbsupsmilie:

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Posted: 23 December 2015 12:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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It’s a lot less common than it used to be. 30-25 years ago when I lived in North London it was normal for the bin men to knock on your door when making their rounds on the day nearest Christmas, and say ‘Just come to empty your bins, sir/madam. Merry Christmas’ with the expectation that you would take the hint and press a banknote into their hand. I don’t think they do that anywhere now. It’s possible of course that the practice is officially discouraged by the councils that employ them. But I think a lot of the decline in such customs is due to the increasing distances that people travel to work and the numbers of married women who do: in many homes there’s never anybody in when the postman or binman comes, so they don’t know each other and there’s no sense that it’s in any way a personal service. Similarly, if groceries are delivered it’s by a supermarket’s home-delivery arm, not the grocer’s boy on a bike.

In small family-business shops you do find a collecting box on the counter in the run-up to Christmas, for regular customers to put something in. When I go to my butcher to pick up my goose tomorrow I’ll make sure to have a fiver handy to put in it.

But none of this actually happens on Boxing Day. Anybody who knocks hoping to get a ‘Christmas box’ from customers and clients does it on a working day, and takes 26 December as a holiday. No longer does

The prentice-boy wi ruddy face
& rhyme-bepowdered dancing locks
From door to door wi happy pace
Runs round to claim his christmass box

as he did in John Clare’s time.

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Posted: 23 December 2015 06:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Well, for your last question, here in Holland it used to be more accepted a decade or two back to give the postman or delivery boys of free papers a bit extra at Xmas, but nowadays that’s all been cut back to a minimum as margins only count for independent post companies.

I assumed the question related to customers giving tips, not employers giving bonuses.

We give the woman who delivers our Sunday Times a few bucks each Christmas, and we give Mo, our regular mailwoman (no, that’s not a regular word), the same plus a little bag with my wife’s home-baked cookies, because we like her and she always goes the extra mile for us.  But I have to watch and make sure it’s her in the mail truck before dashing out with the goodies, because sometimes she’s replaced by a lout who doesn’t bother to close the mailbox after shoving the bills in.

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Posted: 23 December 2015 08:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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languagehat - 23 December 2015 06:11 AM

Well, for your last question, here in Holland it used to be more accepted a decade or two back to give the postman or delivery boys of free papers a bit extra at Xmas, but nowadays that’s all been cut back to a minimum as margins only count for independent post companies.

I assumed the question related to customers giving tips, not employers giving bonuses.

It does relate to customers giving tips. We are explicity told not to ask for gratuities at this time of year, it’s in our conditions of employment. Thank goodness I say, as it saves us earning too much from doing a post round… ho ho ho.

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Posted: 23 December 2015 05:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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We are explicity told not to ask for gratuities at this time of year, it’s in our conditions of employment.

Oh, Mo would never dream of asking for anything, we just do it because we love her, and she always sends us a nice thank-you card.  When she retires, we won’t be giving the lout fresh-baked cookies.

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Posted: 24 December 2015 02:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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As a small boy, I lived in England for several years, and remember Boxing Day as the day on which we went to the pantomime. I shall never forget those magic, riotous moments of audience participation, when we all wished Tinker Bell back to health, or vociferously identified Wishee Washee, the Widow Twankey’s sidekick, in his various disguises.

Wikipedia has an excellent article on Pantomime. I was glad to read that Pantomime is alive and well, and living in several countries……

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Posted: 26 December 2015 09:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Happy Boxing Day, everyone. (Despite what Dave says, obviously named for the fistfights that break out between siblings when they try to play with each other’s Christmas presents.)

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Posted: 26 December 2015 12:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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It wasn’t quite clear from the entry. Is Boxing Day, although not under that name, a public holiday in the US?

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Posted: 26 December 2015 07:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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aldiboronti - 26 December 2015 12:44 PM

It wasn’t quite clear from the entry. Is Boxing Day, although not under that name, a public holiday in the US?

The New Yorker today has a fun take on Boxing Day in the US.

One person you will surely run into is the pizza deliverer. Today, it is a tradition to eat things that are, of course, boxed. Pizza, candy, and some types of wine are popular, as is boxed food called “takeout,” which, in America, only sometimes refers to food that is “taken out” of a restaurant—in other words, fetched by the purchaser. More often, “takeout” means “delivery.” Listen for the American idiomatic phrase “Let’s get takeout for Boxing Day,” followed by “Someone call for pizza.”

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Posted: 27 December 2015 07:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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The actual answer is no, it’s not (and Americans are not familiar with “Boxing Day” unless they’re anglophiles).

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Posted: 28 December 2015 09:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Most mass-market calendars sold in the U.S. note “Boxing Day (Canada)” and sometimes list other Commonwealth countries but most Americans probably don’t realize it’s a paid holiday like Victoria Day and Civic Holiday in August which are also Canadian holidays on our calendars. 

December 26 is also noted as “Kwanzaa begins” on the same calendars, but as black comedian Michael Che said “Only Rachel Dolezal and McDonald’s” celebrate Kwanzaa.

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