Schlong (noun) schlong (verb) when is it vulgar? 
Posted: 23 December 2015 07:40 PM   [ Ignore ]
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It’s hard to determine when something becomes vulgar in our language these days. The utterer of the “she [Hillary Clinton] was schlonged”, epithet insists that it’s not vulgar but somehow a common expression for being defeated.

I thought of the word “suck” in this regard. In my youth (the 50s and 60s) it had only one meaning. Now a young and entirely innocent person can utter the word without knowing the word’s original meaning. It just means that something’s bad.

Is it posible that the “he who shall be unnamed” person who uttered this phrase “she was schlonged” is totally without guile in sayiing that the noun “schlong” which he has converted into a verb and placed it in the past tense is not vulgar, but simply means “defeated.”

At what point does a phrase which was originally patently vulgar become possible to use in polite discourse?

two questions, I guess.

1. when did a word like “suck” become common enough in it’s derivative use of meaning “bad” no longer recall its original meaning?

2. is schlong even close to that status?

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Posted: 23 December 2015 08:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Is it posible that the “he who shall be unnamed” person who uttered this phrase “she was schlonged” is totally without guile in sayiing that the noun “schlong” which he has converted into a verb and placed it in the past tense is not vulgar, but simply means “defeated.”

No.

2. is schlong even close to that status?

No.

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Posted: 23 December 2015 08:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Daily Mail

A National Public Radio host said that year that the Democrats’ 1984 Walter Mondale-Geraldine Ferraro ticket was ‘schlonged at the polls’
Clinton pollster Dick Morris used the word in 2006 on Fox News to predict a rough congressional midterm election for President George W. Bush

Well is seems Schlonged in reference to its most current usage by Mr. Utterer was used in the same context approximately thirty years ago.

But then, had he said, “she was fucked” the meaning would have been the same, indicating that she was defeated.

“When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean - neither more nor less.”

There’s no question that, “she was schlonged”, is a vulgar expression, for that was the intention of the utterer. Words aren’t inherently vulgar, but when the sense is used for that effect it becomes vulgar.

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Posted: 24 December 2015 05:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I thought of the word “suck” in this regard. In my youth (the 50s and 60s) it had only one meaning. Now a young and entirely innocent person can utter the word without knowing the word’s original meaning. It just means that something’s bad.

That’s not the original meaning. The original meaning was something akin to suck wind. The sexual connotations were read into it by others who didn’t see the metaphor. (I need to put this one on the Big List. Someone remind me after the holidays.)

As for schlong, Ben Zimmer has a nice write up on Politico. The verb seems to be limited in use and rather regional, found primarily in the New York City environs. Here the imagery is of being slapped in the face by someone’s penis. Urbandictionary, which has two cites of the past participle, also notes it can simply mean to be hit, to take a blow.

Is it posible that the “he who shall be unnamed” person who uttered this phrase “she was schlonged” is totally without guile in sayiing that the noun “schlong” which he has converted into a verb and placed it in the past tense is not vulgar, but simply means “defeated.”

I would say yes, especially given who we’re talking about. He often doesn’t engage his brain before putting his mouth in gear. (Although we don’t know. He could have used the word precisely because he knew it would be controversial and would keep him in the news.) But unlike suck, it’s not a word that can be used without sexual connotation.

There’s no question that, “she was schlonged”, is a vulgar expression, for that was the intention of the utterer. Words aren’t inherently vulgar, but when the sense is used for that effect it becomes vulgar.

We don’t know what his intention was. I think it’s perfectly possible that he didn’t intend the sexual meaning, especially being a New Yorker prone to profanity. And it’s not just the intent of the utterer that determines whether or not a word is offensive. The context and how it is received (e.g., suck) also matters. While it might be unoffensive when uttered in a New York bar in reference to a football game, when spoken by a national politician about a female presidential contender the word is offensive no matter what the intention.

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Posted: 24 December 2015 06:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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More on the non-sexual use of schlong. It’s based on the observations of random people, so caution is in order on the specific claims (especially about the etymology), but the general point seems to be correct.

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Posted: 24 December 2015 08:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Dave Wilton - 24 December 2015 06:44 AM

More on the non-sexual use of schlong. It’s based on the observations of random people, so caution is in order on the specific claims (especially about the etymology), but the general point seems to be correct.

When I click on your link it takes me immediately back to the OP and these comments.

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Posted: 24 December 2015 09:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Here’s the correct link.

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Posted: 24 December 2015 04:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Is this a political discussion or a linguistic discussion? I don’t mind politics, but let’s be open about it.

Merry Christmas to one and all!

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Posted: 25 December 2015 07:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Iron Pyrite - 24 December 2015 04:51 PM

Is this a political discussion or a linguistic discussion? I don’t mind politics, but let’s be open about it.

Merry Christmas to one and all!

It’s a word question. When does a vulgarity cease to be vulgar. Dave’s response was right to the point. The utterer in question is a vulgar man who uses expressions without thinking. Is that a politically partisan observation? Perhaps. But it is altogether germane to the question I raised.

best of the holidays to you.

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