BL: poutine, pudding
Posted: 14 April 2016 05:42 AM   [ Ignore ]
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The origin is a mess

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Posted: 14 April 2016 07:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I had to look up “cheese curds” in wikipedia, to find out what they were. I suppose a lot would depend on the composition and flavour of the gravy.

De gustibus non disputandum.

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Posted: 14 April 2016 11:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I first encounted fries and gravy in the summer of 1979 at Murphy’s Steak House in Bartlesville, Oklahoma.  A few years later I learned about the famous Baltimore version, and much later after that I heard about poutine. Both the Bartlesville and Baltimore versions are sans cheese curds (which the Quebecois can keep, as far as I’m concerned).  I’ve made the dish myself using the gravy-like sauce recipe that goes with Springfield cashew chicken (a Chinese/Ozark fusion).  Maybe I should call it “Poutine Aux Arcs”.

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Posted: 14 April 2016 11:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Something missing here, Dave.

A direct borrowing from English, however, seems less likely as there is no explanation for a shift from the to .

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Posted: 15 April 2016 12:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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They tried to market it in Russia but the Vladamir poutine did not catch on.

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Posted: 15 April 2016 03:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Something missing here, Dave.

Thanks. I put the letters in oblong brackets:

<d> to <t>

, which is a standard way to denote letters as letters, but I forgot the html would parse them as tags.

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