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Pled guilty
Posted: 16 April 2016 05:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Yes, I too differentiate the spellings according to the pronunciation.

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Posted: 16 April 2016 10:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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And then there’s /lept/ and /li:pt/ for leaped, where the same difference in pronunciation is not accompanied by a difference in spelling.

The way the lizard crept up the wall creeped me out.

Thanks for the nice examples, languagehat and Dr Techie.

Note that “leapt” is given as a past form in the OED (after leaped).

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Posted: 18 April 2016 02:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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’Flied out’ and ‘flew out’.

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Posted: 18 April 2016 10:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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kurwamac - 18 April 2016 02:28 AM

‘Flied out’ and ‘flew out’.

Flied? I’ve never heard that form in the wild and OED doesn’t list it as a past tense or past participle.

Ah, I’m mistaken.

Also weak pa. tense (rare and chiefly for rhyme): ME flyghed, ME, 16 flyde, 16 flide, flied, flyed.

Does it really have much currency?

[ Edited: 18 April 2016 10:29 AM by aldiboronti ]
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Posted: 18 April 2016 10:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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It’s quite common in the baseball context (i.e., to hit a fly ball that is caught for an out).

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Posted: 19 April 2016 01:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Dave Wilton - 18 April 2016 10:51 AM

It’s quite common in the baseball context (i.e., to hit a fly ball that is caught for an out).

The cricket term for this same sense is probably quite different and doesn’t include any mention of flying.  “Given out caught” seems to be the correct version.

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Posted: 19 April 2016 04:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Faldage - 19 April 2016 01:58 AM

Dave Wilton - 18 April 2016 10:51 AM
It’s quite common in the baseball context (i.e., to hit a fly ball that is caught for an out).

The cricket term for this same sense is probably quite different and doesn’t include any mention of flying.  “Given out caught” seems to be the correct version.

A ball that is struck straight up in cricket (usually as a result of an unfortunate edge) is sometimes called a skier. The batsman is said to have skied the ball. If the ball is caught (which is the expected outcome) he might be said to have skied out. This isn’t formal terminology, it isn’t in the Laws of Cricket or anything: just something cricket commentators say. Skied out would be the cricket equivalent of flied out, but it is not an example of the situationally dependent past form we are discussing, as there is no other past form of sky.

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Posted: 20 April 2016 02:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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OP Tipping - 19 April 2016 04:48 PM



A ball that is struck straight up in cricket (usually as a result of an unfortunate edge) is sometimes called a skier. The batsman is said to have skied the ball. If the ball is caught (which is the expected outcome) he might be said to have skied out. This isn’t formal terminology, it isn’t in the Laws of Cricket or anything: just something cricket commentators say. Skied out would be the cricket equivalent of flied out, but it is not an example of the situationally dependent past form we are discussing, as there is no other past form of sky.

The argument that I have seen for “flied out” is that when a new verb is coined its conjugation is made regular.  Since “fly” in this context derives from the noun/adjective as in “fly ball” and not as an extension of the verb “fly” its past tense is “flied”, not “flew”.

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Posted: 20 April 2016 02:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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OP Tipping - 19 April 2016 04:48 PM

A ball that is struck straight up in cricket (usually as a result of an unfortunate edge) is sometimes called a skier. The batsman is said to have skied the ball. If the ball is caught (which is the expected outcome) he might be said to have skied out. This isn’t formal terminology, it isn’t in the Laws of Cricket or anything: just something cricket commentators say. Skied out would be the cricket equivalent of flied out, but it is not an example of the situationally dependent past form we are discussing, as there is no other past form of sky.

I can see you’ll never be catched out, OPT!

BTW, what about led/leaded as two differently used past participles?

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Posted: 20 April 2016 04:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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BlackGrey - 20 April 2016 02:11 AM

OP Tipping - 19 April 2016 04:48 PM

A ball that is struck straight up in cricket (usually as a result of an unfortunate edge) is sometimes called a skier. The batsman is said to have skied the ball. If the ball is caught (which is the expected outcome) he might be said to have skied out. This isn’t formal terminology, it isn’t in the Laws of Cricket or anything: just something cricket commentators say. Skied out would be the cricket equivalent of flied out, but it is not an example of the situationally dependent past form we are discussing, as there is no other past form of sky.

I can see you’ll never be catched out, OPT!

BTW, what about led/leaded as two differently used past participles?

Well, I will need you to explain what you are talking about. I am not aware that “lead” (rhymes with seed) has a past form “leaded” in any context, now.

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Posted: 20 April 2016 07:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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I share OP’s confusion. The only leaded that fits is an adjective rather than a past participle. From OED:

leaded, adj.

a. Covered, lined, loaded, or weighted with lead

.
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Posted: 20 April 2016 11:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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Fall, fell, fallen

fell, felled, felled Example:  He felled the tree…

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Posted: 20 April 2016 11:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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Not really an example of what we’re talking about: not two different preterites of the same verb.

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Posted: 20 April 2016 01:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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Logophile - 20 April 2016 11:00 AM

Fall, fell, fallen

fell, felled, felled Example:  He felled the tree…

There are a number of pairs of verbs in English where one is transitive and weak and the other is intransitive and strong.  Other examples are lie, lay, lain vs. lay, laid, laid and sit, sat, sat vs. set, set, set.  Frequently the transitive present tense verb will look like the past tense of the intransitive one.

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Posted: 20 April 2016 06:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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Not really an example of what we’re talking about: not two different preterites of the same verb.

I know, I just thought I’d throw it in there. Same etymology.

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