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Pled guilty
Posted: 21 April 2016 02:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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Sorry to OPT and aldi - for some reason I thought “to lead a pipe” (pr. ‘led’) meant to add lead to a pipe, and the ‘leaded’ was the pp of same. The sentence is certainly out there, but not meaning what I meant (by mistake).

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Posted: 21 April 2016 03:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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The Wikipedia article on “lead glass” uses the term “leaded crystal” to refer to formulations of glass containing significant percentages of lead compounds. You’re not altogether wrong, BlackGrey.

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Posted: 21 April 2016 07:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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lionello - 21 April 2016 03:38 AM

The Wikipedia article on “lead glass” uses the term “leaded crystal” to refer to formulations of glass containing significant percentages of lead compounds. You’re not altogether wrong, BlackGrey.

Ta for the kind words but I think the point still stands; there is no verb (any more at any rate) ‘to lead’ as related to putting lead into something. The past participle survives as a fossil without active verb (like ‘disgruntled’ f.e.) and is now no more than an adjective in effect.

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Posted: 21 April 2016 07:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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Again, that’s a different verb.  To lead (to add lead to) ≠ to lead (to direct).  They are merely homographs, and it is no more remarkable that they have different past tense forms than it is that lie (to tell falsehoods) and lie (to recline) do.

(Pipped by Blackgrey.  But I’ll disagree with him to this extent: I believe that to lead (to add lead to) is still a living verb among stained-glass workers.)

[ Edited: 21 April 2016 07:08 AM by Dr. Techie ]
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Posted: 21 April 2016 07:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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Well, I never said they were the same verb, did I? It was BlackGrey who brought up leaded, not me. I think Dr. T. has (as usual) the right end of the stick regarding to lead (rhymes with dead), though I wouldn’t agree about stained glass workers. Lead compounds increase the refractive index of glass, which is far more relevant to producers of glazes and decorative glass objects than to producers of stained glass; lead doesn’t impart colour to glass.

Then there’s to blacklead, which was something once done (if I’m not mistaken) to the inside of bake-ovens, using graphite.

The fact is, that I’m no longer 100% sure what this thread’s about.  As G. Gamow once quoted: ”increases, decreases --- what the hell do we care / what the entropy does?”

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Posted: 21 April 2016 12:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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The fact is, that I’m no longer 100% sure what this thread’s about.  As G. Gamow once quoted: ”increases, decreases --- what the hell do we care / what the entropy does?”

The Law of Thread Entropy: the longer the thread gets, the greater the lack of sureness what it’s about.

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Posted: 21 April 2016 01:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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Lead compounds increase the refractive index of glass, which is far more relevant to producers of glazes and decorative glass objects than to producers of stained glass; lead doesn’t impart colour to glass.

True, but traditional stained glass consists of separate pieces of glass held together in a matrix or framework of metal (traditionally lead), and is therefore also referred to as “leaded glass” (technically a somewhat broader category than “stained glass”, since coloring is not required).  See for example here. In my experience, this is what “leaded glass” usually refers to, whereas glass with lead (oxide) dissolved in the glass itself is more often just called “lead glass” or “lead crystal”.

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Posted: 21 April 2016 10:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
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Kamerad!

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Posted: 22 April 2016 06:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 39 ]
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lionello - 21 April 2016 07:55 AM


The fact is, that I’m no longer 100% sure what this thread’s about. 

Claudius: These words are not mine.
Hamlet: No, nor mine now.

This thread could be about anything, but one activity taking place is a scavenger hunt for verbs with two or more currently used past forms.

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Posted: 04 December 2017 05:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 40 ]
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The topic of whether or not an American lawyer would use “pled” has suddenly become important.

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Posted: 04 December 2017 06:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 41 ]
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Would you care to elaborate?

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Posted: 04 December 2017 07:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 42 ]
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The following tweet was made from the @realDonaldTrump account at 1:13pm on 3 Dec 2017.
“I had to fire General Flynn because he lied to the Vice President and the FBI. He has pled guilty to those lies. It is a shame because his actions during the transition were lawful. There was nothing to hide!”

This caused something of a sensation, as it appeared to be an acknowledgment that when the President was pushing the FBI director to drop the investigation in Flynn, he already knew that Flynn had committed a felony, and this acknowledgment would strengthen an obstruction on justice case.

The following day, Whitehouse spokesfolks said that Trump’s personal attorney, John Dowd, had written the tweet on Trump’s account. Dowd himself said hat it had been a sloppy mistake, and that he had not posted on the President’s before and would not again.

Some commentators have said that it seemed unlikely that an experience lawman would use ‘pled’ as the past form of ‘plead’. At least one lingust has popped up to say it is not very unlikely, as that form is still used .

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Posted: 04 December 2017 08:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 43 ]
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This may have already been said, but in recent news accounts of what Gen Flynn did in these last days was “pleaded guilty” to one count of lying to the FBI.

edit: “news accounts”

[ Edited: 05 December 2017 06:54 AM by Oecolampadius ]
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Posted: 05 December 2017 02:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 44 ]
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Ben Zimmer has commented on this in the Atlantic.

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