retronyms vs. ? 
Posted: 04 December 2016 05:46 PM   [ Ignore ]
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A retronym is a name for something in the form ADJ N where the ADJ has been added to a N to distinguish and older version that now needs modification to distinguish it from a new version, e.g., acoustic guitar or analog clock.  There is also a phenomenon where a term has an element that is no longer strictly speaking applicable, e.g., filming a news segment or making a mix tape.  In the first case no film is involved.  In fact it went from tape to some solid state medium but it is still often referred to as filming, Likewise a mix tape has gone from actual magnetic tape through CDs to present day files on something like an iPod.  Is there a term for the latter phenomenon matching filming for the former?

[ Edited: 04 December 2016 05:49 PM by Faldage ]
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Posted: 05 December 2016 05:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Is there a term for the latter phenomenon matching filming for the former?

I’m not understanding what you want.  Did you by chance mean to write “matching retronym” rather than “matching filming”?  (Guessing based on the post title.)

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Posted: 05 December 2016 08:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Is there anything wrong with “recording”?

Edit: what i mean is “tape recording” >>>>> “solid state recording”

[ Edited: 05 December 2016 09:19 AM by lionello ]
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Posted: 05 December 2016 09:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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From your question I’m not sure if you’re asking for a general term for the this type of phrase (the term I have heard used for these is “linguistic skeuomorph") or a specific non-tape term for “mix tape”.

[ Edited: 05 December 2016 09:37 AM by Dr. Techie ]
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Posted: 05 December 2016 10:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Is there anything wrong with “recording”?

There’s nothing “wrong” with it, but it is a more general term. To record something is medium-independent: audio, video, transcript, minutes, etc. To tape something is to make an audio recording, now regardless of physical or electronic medium.

Another one is to dial a phone number.

Skeuomorph isn’t quite right. That’s the incorporation of unnecessary, old design elements in a new thing. (The classic example is the image of a 3.5” floppy disk on a save icon.) The linguistic phenomenon is just a specific type of semantic shift, a form of generalization (e.g., recording audio on magnetic tape to recording audio).

I was going to suggest archaeonym, but that’s in use for something else.

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Posted: 06 December 2016 03:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Dave interpreted my question correctly. I’m looking for a term that would match retronym for the similar phenomenon.  “Dialing a phone” is another example.  Anachronym was suggested on another forum but it seems a little to general.

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Posted: 06 December 2016 05:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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the term I have heard used for these is “linguistic skeuomorph”

Unless you have heard it anywhere else, that was just a wild suggestion of mine with no authority behind it.

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Posted: 06 December 2016 06:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I like skeuonym. It doesn’t make sense from the roots, literally vessel-word, but builds off the established skeuomorph.

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Posted: 06 December 2016 07:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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"Linguistic skeuomorph” is the phrase New Scientist has been using for some time to refer to terms like “filming” on digital media, and if you Google it, you’ll see that it has attained a modest level of use outside that magazine.

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Posted: 07 December 2016 05:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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“Linguistic skeuomorph” is the phrase New Scientist has been using for some time to refer to terms like “filming” on digital media, and if you Google it, you’ll see that it has attained a modest level of use outside that magazine.

Suddenly I feel like Snoopy: ‘Good grief! I’m not unique!’

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Posted: 11 December 2016 05:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Language Log weighs in:

http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=29730

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Posted: 11 December 2016 06:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Faldage - 11 December 2016 05:31 AM

Language Log weighs in:

http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=29730

Good Lord, he just published that.

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