inkledoovery
Posted: 27 October 2007 04:29 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I have known for many years that the word “inkledoovery” is a term given to an object used for a purpose other than that which it was intended. I.E. a milk bottle used as a vase. I can find it no dictionary or web site anywhere! Am I alone out here with this folks?. Has anyone else heard it used?. A Dutch lady named her shop Inkledoovery, my curiosity impeled me to ask.(as it does now)

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Posted: 27 October 2007 04:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Never heard of it. “Inkledoo” gets a few hits but seems to be a cul de sac.  How about a corruption of “it’ll do very” (well - as a vase, etc)?

Edit for typo

[ Edited: 27 October 2007 05:48 AM by Skibberoo ]
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Posted: 27 October 2007 05:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I think your opening statement sets up the situation misleadingly.  How about “I have for many years used ‘inkledoovery’ as a term for an object used for a purpose other than that which it was intended”?  I strongly suspect this is a term unique to your family or circle of classmates (or whatever group you learned it in).  Zero Google hits suggests it is not an actual word.

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Posted: 27 October 2007 05:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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’Dooberry’, however, is a recognised term for something for which you cannot remember the correct designation, like ‘thingumajig’, so even if the usage is peculiar to the OP’s family, I suspect there may be a connexion here.

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Posted: 27 October 2007 06:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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In fairness, the OP did say that “A Dutch lady had opened a shop with that name.” This, I thought, indicated that someone outside her immediate circle was using this unusual name.  If the shop is in her vicinity why not simply ask where the name comes from - and let us know? 

PS welcome to the Board

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Posted: 27 October 2007 11:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Thanks for acknowledging that fact Skibberoo. Thanks also for the welcome.

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Posted: 27 October 2007 12:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I’m still confused.  The sentence “A Dutch lady named her shop Inkledoovery, my curiosity impeled me to ask.(as it does now)” suggested to me that that is where you first heard the term and learned its definition. Am I reading you rightly or wrongly there?  If that was how you first picked up the term, have you heard it used elsewhere independently? It it in the US, UK, or somewhere else that you’ve heard it?

Edit: FWIW, there appears to be a restaurant in New Zealand called The Inkledoovery Limited.  New Zealand was discovered by the Dutch and although settled primarily by the British has had significant Dutch immigration.

[ Edited: 27 October 2007 03:09 PM by Dr. Techie ]
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Posted: 27 October 2007 08:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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"Doovery"/"doobry"/etc. = “doohickey” = “thing whose name is unknown” or so. I think the form “doovery” may be popular in New Zealand.

“Inkle” looks like Dutch “enkel”, = “single"/"mere[ly]"/etc.

There is a NZ tourist attraction called “Enkledoovery Korna”.

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Posted: 27 October 2007 09:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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It was that Featherstone shop in N.Z. back in 1982-3 that I had this exchange. The woman spoke as though it was an every-day expression and was quite normal to her. I have stumbled across it again over the years but can’t remember where. It may well have found its way into the English language via this forum!

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Posted: 27 October 2007 11:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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There’s a “Featherston” (no last ‘e’), in New Zealand.  A search of several business directories for that town reveals no ‘inkledoovery.’ But, 25 years is a long time in retailing. Seems that the town has become gentrified in recent times and business has flocked there. Your Dutch lady’s shop seems not to have survived, but with a name like that should we be surprised?  Now, had she chosen Bloomingdales, Selfridges or Tiffanys, she might have stood a chance!  ;-)

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Posted: 28 October 2007 10:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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The restaurant I referred to above is in Featherston (or was, recently enough to be included in that on-line business directory).  Although triffid has avoided actually answering my question, I read the last response as indicating that this restaurant is the “shop” previously mentioned, and that triffid’s use of the word and the business name are not independent data points, but rather that triffid’s exposure to the term came from the business and its owner.  Were the other users that triffid claims to have encountered also from Featherston, and might they also have picked it up from the same source?  Is there reason to believe this is more than a part of the idiolect of one Dutch-New Zealander restaurant owner, who used it in the name of her business and thus spread it to a few other speakers in that area?

[ Edited: 28 October 2007 11:31 AM by Dr. Techie ]
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Posted: 28 October 2007 03:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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It would seem likely that EnkleDooVery Korna (a wallaby farm or something like that) has a name which is at least related to the restaurant’s name. Both are in NZ but far apart, on different islands.

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Posted: 29 October 2007 10:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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It’s of little consequence. Next time I pass through Featherston I will make some inquiries. Thanks for the imput gents. I will keep you posted if any revelations come to hand. Incidently, it may be of interest to some. Featherston was originally to be called Burlington. Apparently, Mr. Burling owed a Dr. Featherston a deal of money, so a trade was made.

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Posted: 16 August 2013 02:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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triffid - 27 October 2007 09:57 PM

It was that Featherstone shop in N.Z. back in 1982-3 that I had this exchange. The woman spoke as though it was an every-day expression and was quite normal to her. I have stumbled across it again over the years but can’t remember where. It may well have found its way into the English language via this forum!

I remember when the Inkledoovery Emporium was being opened.  I don’t know where the Dutch thing comes from. Olive and her son were British, perhaps from Manchester or Liverpool, I can’t quite recall. We knew them from Auckland. I cannot remember their surname though. They were quite eccentric. Olive had a pet goat named Horatio, and her son had been successful in TV production before moving to NZ, he had worked on the Kenny Everett show, which was a big thing at the time. This was the early 1980s, say around 1981.  My sister and I took the Silver Fern down to stay a couple of times. Featherston was a very sleepy town back then! I probably asked what it meant at the time and as far as I recall it just meant useless knick-knacks, in whichever part of England they came from. You had to wait five years - but there’s your answer.... last time I checked in, say a year or two ago, it was still open as a cafe/gift shop but now seems to be gone.

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