HD: ADS WOTY
Posted: 07 January 2017 07:07 AM   [ Ignore ]
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It’s dumpster fire.

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Posted: 07 January 2017 07:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I do like laissez-fairydust.

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Posted: 09 January 2017 12:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I’m surprised by gaslight as Most Likely to Succeed since, as Dave notes, it’s already succeeded. OED cites it from 1969 and I remember it as certainly current in the UK by the mid to late 70s. I wasn’t aware of any particular resurgence of use over the last year but I bow to the ADS.

Bigly sounds straight from the Simpsons but this mishearing of Trump’s big league isn’t a neologism. Though marked as rare by OED it’s been around a long time. (Earliest and latest citations shown.)

bigly, adv.

1. With great force; firmly, violently; (also) stoutly, strongly.

c1400 (▸?c1380) Patience l. 321 Þe barrez of vche a bonk ful bigly me haldes.
1913 H. Walpole Fortitude (1919) i. ix. 105 He was bigly made and his legs and arms were round.

2. Loudly, boastfully; proudly, haughtily, pompously.

a1500 Sidrak & Bokkus (Laud) (1999) II. 9225 Tonge begynneþ to waxe biglye And of his youthe he bosteth an hye.
1927 E. Thompson Indian Day xvii. 144 The same students who talked bigly among themselves of ‘Douglas’ and ‘Alden’ and ‘Jacks’.

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Posted: 09 January 2017 05:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I’m surprised by gaslight as Most Likely to Succeed since, as Dave notes, it’s already succeeded. OED cites it from 1969 and I remember it as certainly current in the UK by the mid to late 70s. I wasn’t aware of any particular resurgence of use over the last year but I bow to the ADS.

That was my first thought too, but then I noticed the category was “Most Useful / Most Likely to Succeed.” I wasn’t at the meeting to hear the deliberations, but as I mentioned, I’ll bet that it came in under the “Most Useful” flag. There has definitely been a resurgence of the term. I’m hearing it all over the place, where only a couple of years ago it was a rare word. (Not just diegogarcity, as I was quite familiar with it before.)

I also think there may be a shift in meaning going on. My impression, and it’s just a subjective impression, is that the word is being used in the sense of “convince someone what they thought had happened/is happening isn’t,” with a de-emphasis on doubting one’s sanity.

[ Edited: 09 January 2017 05:35 AM by Dave Wilton ]
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