HD: What did Old Norse sound like? 
Posted: 16 January 2017 12:58 PM   [ Ignore ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  6303
Joined  2007-01-03

You gotta trust a man in a cowboy hat...

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 January 2017 04:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3015
Joined  2007-01-30

Most enjoyable.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 January 2017 04:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3458
Joined  2007-01-31

According to survivors, it was usually louder.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 17 January 2017 02:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  287
Joined  2007-02-15

Yeah, that was fun!

Always wondered how the old Norse types pronounced that annoying ‘r’ at the end of nearly EVERY OLD NORSE WORD you find referenced when looking up mostly Anglo-saxon words in an English etymological dictionary.

Actually, quite disappointing really… I kinda hoped it would be a silent sound (sic)…

Profile
 
 
Posted: 17 January 2017 06:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4493
Joined  2007-01-29

"I fear more for Memory”—yup, me too!  Great video, thanks for posting it.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 January 2017 10:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Moderator
Rank
Total Posts:  19
Joined  2014-02-21

Or perhaps it sounded more like this?

http://www.omniglot.com/writing/elfdalian.htm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62uJxMBNVCs

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 January 2017 04:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  6303
Joined  2007-01-03

Not really. Nordic languages can be broken into three broad categories of dialects, East Nordic (Swedish), West Nordic (Norwegian/Danish), and Insular Nordic (Icelandic, Faroese). Elfdalian occupies a middle position between East and West (Swedish and Norwegian). In contrast, the literary Old Norse that is preserved and studied is predominantly Insular (Icelandic), with some West Nordic manuscripts thrown in.

There are, evidently, some specific features of Old Norse that are preserved in Elfdalian and not in other North Germanic dialects, but that doesn’t mean it’s especially close to the older language in general. American English, for instance, preserves certain features that have been lost in British English, but that doesn’t mean we Leftpondians sound like Brits from centuries ago. (Nearly every dialect preserves some features that have been lost in its sister-dialects.)

Profile