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GOAT
Posted: 06 February 2017 11:00 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I’m seeing this everywhere since Tom Brady led the Patriots to that astonishing victory over the Falcons (and what an incredible game that was. I don’t usually follow American football but I make the occasional exception for big games and I’m grateful I didn’t miss this one even if in recording.) The acronym is used of Brady so my guess is that it’s Greatest Of All Time. How long has it been in use though?

ETA another question re this article.

On Feb. 3, 2002, Brady took over at his own 17-yard line with no timeouts, and color commentator John Madden spoke for most of America in suggesting the Patriots should “run the clock out” and “play for overtime.”

Color commentator?

[ Edited: 06 February 2017 11:11 PM by aldiboronti ]
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Posted: 07 February 2017 02:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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It’s been in use on hiphop boards since the early years of the millennium. G.O.A.T. was the name of LL Cool J’s album released in 2000: I can’t say for sure that he coined the expression but its general use took off not long after that.

A color commentator gives depth and analysis and excitement, as distinct from a play-by-play commentator, who just says what’s happening.

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Posted: 07 February 2017 05:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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My wife and I were in bed, some time after 10, when she sleepily wondered if the Patriots had won (because she was going to be seeing a Pats fan the next day), and I said “I’ll find out” and checked my iPhone. “Huh,” I said, “they’re tied at 28 in overtime.” “Huh,” she said, and we went to sleep.

We are not football fans.

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Posted: 07 February 2017 06:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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aldiboronti - 06 February 2017 11:00 PM

Color commentator?

Edit:  Oops, I didn’t notice that OPT had already answered…

In sports broadcasting the are 3 types of announcers.  The play-by-play man, who is a professional announcer.  The analyst, who is usually a former player or coach who can explain the reasons why a certain play was run or what a player/coach may have been thinking.  The color commentator is also usually a former player or coach, but his main job is to tell humorous anecdotes and dispense catch phrases.  TV broadcasts often use all 3 types but radio usually only has 2 guys in the booth.

Here’s a link to a Wikipedia article.  This article says the color commentator and analyst are one in the same, and they can be, but my New York Mets currently use 3 TV broadcasters with 3 distinct responsibilities.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sports_commentator#Analyst.2Fcolor_commentator

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Posted: 07 February 2017 06:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I presume it’s pronounced as an initialism rather than an acronym, but I can’t help thinking of Charlie Brown’s pitcher’s mound meditations on being “the hero or the goat”.

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Posted: 07 February 2017 12:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Thanks for the answers. I suspected that it had something to do with background colour.

And that’s a point. I can’t remember hearing it in the commentary, just how is GOAT usually pronounced?

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Posted: 07 February 2017 03:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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my New York Mets

Nice to meet a fellow Mets fan/sufferer!

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Posted: 08 February 2017 06:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I don’t believe that the distinction between a color commentator and an analyst is universally recognized.  In the instant case, John Madden is characterized as a color commentator, when he is actually an analyst, and a good one.  He has the effusive personality of a color commentator, but he actually knows what he is talking about.

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Posted: 08 February 2017 06:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Ignorant as I am of the majority of American sports I had to check the New York Mets out to see what they played. That led me to the wiki on them and the discovery that they came into being when the Brooklyn Dodgers and the NY Giants moved to California. Intrigued as to the reason for such a move I go to the wiki for the Brooklyn Dodgers and find it was all about land, a tussle between the owner and Robert Moses.

This leads me in turn to an absolute gem of a documentary, Brooklyn Dodgers: Ghosts of Flatbush. I’ve just finished watching it. What a glorious record of the coming together of people of all ethnicities, the integration of baseball, the triumphs, the heartbreaking losses to the Yankees and especially that one to the Giants, and finally the huge blow to those wonderful Dodgers fans of the disappearance of their beloved team over the Western horizon. Marvelous! Thanks, jtab, I never would have seen it had not you brought up the Mets.

BTW the documentary makers interviewed player Ralph Branca for the show who reminisced about that loss to the Giants for which he felt responsible. During that interview he comments:

Here went the pennant down the drain, big league, and now I’m gonna be labeled a goat.

An instance of diegogarcity which leads to fresh confusion on my part!

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Posted: 08 February 2017 06:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Here went the pennant down the drain, big league, and now I’m gonna be labeled a goat.
Aldi, Don’t be confused, he was only kidding!

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Posted: 08 February 2017 06:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Not only is the history of the Dodgers fascinating, but the early years of the Mets is, perhaps, the most compelling and fun story in the history of American sports. This clip from Ken Burns’s Baseball brilliantly sums up those early years.

And then there was the “miracle” of 1969.

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Posted: 08 February 2017 08:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Dave Wilton - 08 February 2017 06:56 AM

Not only is the history of the Dodgers fascinating, but the early years of the Mets is, perhaps, the most compelling and fun story in the history of American sports. This clip from Ken Burns’s Baseball brilliantly sums up those early years.

And then there was the “miracle” of 1969.

Great clips! Casey Stengel looks as old as baseball itself in that first one. I must get hold of that Ken Burns film, I really enjoyed his Civil War. Unfortunately while it’s available on PBS they have the usual geographic blocking in place. I’ll fire up my Tor browser later, I should be able to get to it that way. Even though I’m not sure whether I could watch and enjoy a whole baseball game yet I must say I’m finding the history of the sport absolutely fascinating. It seems to be representative of America far more than its fellow sport football.

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Posted: 08 February 2017 10:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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aldiboronti - 08 February 2017 08:28 AM

It seems to be representative of America far more than its fellow sport football.

When my East Midlands wife arrived in the U.S., she was perplexed by my fascination with baseball, and asked me to explain the game to her.  I did so.  “Oh!  Rounders!” she declared.  Seems baseball is another American vice with British roots.

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Posted: 08 February 2017 12:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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I must say I’m finding the history of the sport absolutely fascinating.

I highly recommend Lawrence S. Ritter’s The Glory of Their Times.  It’s an oral history done when a lot of the early-twentieth-century players were still alive, and I found it absolutely enthralling as a book decades ago; more recently my wife gave me the 4-CD set of the actual interviews, and it’s even better to hear the voices of the players telling the stories.  I also recommend The Fireside Book of Baseball and The Armchair Book of Baseball as enjoyable collections, and… well, I’ve got a whole lot of books to urge on you if you’re interested: histories, memoirs, novels, you name it!

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Posted: 08 February 2017 02:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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David Block’s Baseball Before We Knew It: A Search for the Roots of the Game is another excellent history of the very early origins of the game, from the earliest medieval bat and ball games through the nineteenth century.

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Posted: 08 February 2017 06:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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I would like to second Dave’s endorsement of Baseball Before We Knew It. It is both informative and entertaining, and you will wish it had twice the pages.

As a childhood Orioles fan, I well remember the Pact With the Devil of 1969:)

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