Takeaway
Posted: 03 March 2017 03:00 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Online Etymology Dictionary gives a date of 1964 for this and that’s as a verb. As a noun they’re saying 1970.

However, a good friend in Australia claims that the phrase “Chinese Takeaway” was in full swing by 1964.

Does anyone here have any thoughts on the origin of this phrase?

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Posted: 03 March 2017 05:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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OED:

1941 Irish Times 24 Nov. 5/7 The Goodwill Restaurant is serving 6,000 midday meals a week, 1,000 take-aways.

And for the verb it has this:

1894 Daily World (Lawrence, Kansas) 13 Sept.  The same persons who came when it was first opened are still among the number to be seen there, either procuring food to take away or getting it at the long counters to eat at the room.

And the North American take out is a bit older:

1940 Mason City (Iowa) Globe-Gaz. 29 Mar. 11/1 Our day and night fountain service is finding favor with late folks. Counter served or take-outs.

And the verb:

1919 Jrnl. Industr. Hygiene Sept. 239/1 There was a cafeteria not far from the works, where they could go for lunch or could get food to take out.

I’ll say again, the Online Etymology Dictionary isn’t the greatest resource. It’s mainly cribbed from the OED, and often from older entries at that. In this case, the OED updated these entries in September 2015. It’s not bad as a free resource for a quick check of something, but it’s far from the final word.

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Posted: 04 March 2017 02:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Dave Wilton - 03 March 2017 05:15 PM

I’ll say again, the Online Etymology Dictionary isn’t the greatest resource. It’s mainly cribbed from the OED, and often from older entries at that. In this case, the OED updated these entries in September 2015. It’s not bad as a free resource for a quick check of something, but it’s far from the final word.

Absolutely, that’s why I decided to check with the good people here.

Thanks for your help, once again.

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Posted: 06 March 2017 08:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I still see “take out” from time to time, but it seems to me that it’s more common to say “to go” these days.

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