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Geordie
Posted: 15 April 2017 04:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Dave Wilton - 06 March 2017 10:23 AM

The British Isles includes Britain, all of Ireland, the Isle of Man, the Channel Islands, and other assorted islands.

While you are absolutely correct, you will find several million Irish people will disagree with you vehemently, and there are numerous arguments on this subject all over the internet. Nobody from the Republic will ever use the expression “the British Isles”, since to most Irish people the term implies British ownership of Ireland: the politically correct term in the 26 counties, and Republican areas of Northern Ireland, is “these islands”. Ironically, the word “Britain” almost certainly comes from the people known to the Irish as the Cruithni and to Brythonic speakers as the Pritani (the Welsh for Britain is still Prydain), whom the Romans called the Picts, and the Cruithni/Pritani lived in both Ireland and Britain and were, if not Celtic, pre-Celtic, so nothing to do with the Saesnach.

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Posted: 15 April 2017 04:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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aldiboronti - 04 March 2017 08:23 AM

Garrat Elections

The Garrat Elections were a carnival of mock elections in 18th century Surrey, England. The events were organized around May 20, when a crowd of tens of thousands would travel from London, centred just 5 miles (8.0 km) away to take part.

Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, originally published in 1785 by Francis Grose, described the Garrat Election as:

A ludicrous ceremony, practiced every new parliament: it consists of a mock election of two members to represent the borough of Garret [sic] (a few straggling cottages, near Wandsworth, in Surrey). The qualification of a voter is, having enjoyed a woman, in the open air, within that district: the candidates are commonly fellows of low humor, who dress themselves up in a ridiculous manner. As this brings a prodigious concourse of people to Wandsworth, the publicans of that place jointly contribute to the expense, which is sometimes considerable.

I used to live in Garrett Lane, Wandsworth, and thus had heard of the Mayor of Garrett. Here’s another entertaining account of some of the “mayors”: the writer has given them “knighthoods” and called them “Sir Soandso”, since a knighthood is what the real mayor of London would have received upon his election

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Posted: 15 April 2017 10:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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and the Cruithni/Pritani lived in both Ireland and Britain and were, if not Celtic, pre-Celtic, so nothing to do with the Saesnach.

Let’s note in passing that Sasunnach, however spelt, was originally the name the Gaelic-speakers of the Highlands and Islands used for Lowland Scots. But don’t try using it in that sense nowadays.

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Posted: 15 April 2017 05:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Syntinen Laulu - 15 April 2017 10:02 AM

and the Cruithni/Pritani lived in both Ireland and Britain and were, if not Celtic, pre-Celtic, so nothing to do with the Saesnach.

Let’s note in passing that Sasunnach, however spelt, was originally the name the Gaelic-speakers of the Highlands and Islands used for Lowland Scots. But don’t try using it in that sense nowadays.

Also worth pointing out that they were quite right and that the Sassenachs’ language was Saxon-tinted English. As Edimburgers (?) we were told about the Sassenach thing so we were able to react to insults from fellow Scots from higher climes. Apparently Sassenachs were everyone to the south of the river Forth in our part of the woods and the Clyde on the other side.

And the first place this Scot conquered in Holland was Sassenheim. Well, they put up with me for a bit anyway…

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