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PIssing in the wind
Posted: 02 April 2017 11:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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JFTR, I once used “revenant” to refer to wordgeek during one of his recrudescences on this site (as bela_okmix).  But Lionello did not participate in that thread, so I suppose he can be forgiven.

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Posted: 02 April 2017 11:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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I mean, was he/she being ironic?

ps what the hell is the current pronoun of choice for an indeterminate gender?

The quotee is obviously a male.

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Posted: 03 April 2017 12:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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lionello - 02 April 2017 04:39 AM

A writer who chooses, for the title of his novel, an obscure word which will send most people rummaging for a dictionary, might be someone with lurking feelings of inferiority, who feels he has to establish a position of superiority vis-a-vis his readers. In that case, he might also do this by (inter alia) using common phrases in uncommon (and not necessarily meaningful) ways, to keep his readers guessing, which he’s certainly succeeded in doing in this case.  Of course, the phrase may not be in the original book --- but my guess would be, it is.

The book and the more popular film The revenant is a story about revenge. The main character in the film, and the book, is viciously mauled by a Grizzly bear and is abandoned by two men who were ordered to take care of him before he dies. He manages to survive and his most passionate desire is revenge.
There is more to the story, but the gist is about the revenant: one that returns after death. Therefore, the writer chose, in my opinion, the more appropriate word. If there is not a better word then one must choose the obscure or more challenging word.

Revenant might be an obscure word, but it is the more appropriate and precise word for the title.

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Posted: 03 April 2017 07:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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I agree, somewhat unusually, with Logophile.

FWIW, the Amazon “Search Inside” feature, turns up one use of the word “pissing” in the novel, unrelated to the current discussion, and no instances of the word “retirement”.  I continue to favor my idea that the use of the phrase in the movie is because of a scriptwriter who didn’t understand what it means.

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Posted: 03 April 2017 07:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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I’m not sure I’d term it an obscure word. And I’d forgotten that WG sock; revenant was le mot juste considering the handle.

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Posted: 03 April 2017 12:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Seems the word revenant was obscure chiefly to me. Sorry to have kicked up an unnecessary fuss. I hope you guys enjoy the movie. I understand it’s doing very well, kudos-wise.

And --- i learned a new word.

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Posted: 03 April 2017 02:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Seems the word revenant was obscure chiefly to me.

I can not make that assessment for anyone on this forum, but everyone I spoke to about the film were not familiar with the word.

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Posted: 15 April 2017 01:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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lionello - 02 April 2017 08:29 AM

of all the Band 4 examples quoted by Dave from the OED, only embouchure was unfamiliar.

Did you not develop a fine embouchure practising the kazoo, Lionello?

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Posted: 15 April 2017 09:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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I’m afraid you’ve caught me out in an exaggeration. I have only rarely had access to a real kazoo — the nearest I got, most of the time, was a comb and tissue paper.  Not the best equipment for developing an accomplished embouchure (I can’t resist the impulse to put the word in italics, though most of the quotes I’ve seen, don’t).

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Posted: 15 April 2017 09:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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As an occasional public performer on the kazoo (and much more rarely on the bamboo flute) I can confidently assert that the former really doesn’t require a specific embouchure.  You stick it in your mouth and hum.

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