schollied
Posted: 01 April 2017 08:30 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Just sharing something new, to me at least. 
In use for over a decade, it hasn’t become common.

I’m surprised MM hasn’t learned from history and hasn’t schollied 15.

source: http://www.ndnation.com/boards/index.php?mcgraw

The thread containing the quote is “A Few Things Heard/Seen Last Night That Made Me Think of ND
by dillon77 (2017-04-01 08:40:46) “

Translation:  I’m surprised Muffet McGraw (coach of a U.S. university women’s basketball team) has not learned from history
and recruited and awarded athletic scholarships to as many women as the rules allow. 

The earliest cite found so far with a cursory google search is this, from November, 2005-

“You beat one fully-funded I-AA team, one partially-schollied I-AA team and one non-scholly I-AA team.”
source: http://www.bisonville.com/forum/showthread.php?3856-SDSU-v-NDSU/page12

This word has spawned variants.

“Apr 18, 2007
Is someone about to be either cut or de-schollied?”

source: http://pacifictigerssports.yuku.com/topic/794/Thomason-likes-his-new-Tiger#.WN_S5-v3aK0

[ Edited: 01 April 2017 01:45 PM by cuchuflete ]
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Posted: 01 April 2017 10:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Completely new to me although the sense would have been pretty easily gathered if I had come across it. It has the distinct flavour of Aussie slang like sickie and barbie, although it’s far from an infallible guide, brolly for instance being British in origin. (There was another word of this type which came up here some time back and which I could have sworn had its roots in Australia but turned out to be American. Can’t for the life of me recall what it was though.)

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Posted: 01 April 2017 10:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Thanks, aldi.  You caused me to look up ‘sickie’.

Sickie

Australian Slang/J Australian Slang
day off sick from work

take the day off sick from work when you’re perfectly healthy

to take time off work , with the reason of sickness, when one is well and just is going fishing or something he does in good health

http://www.slang-dictionary.org/Australian-Slang/J/Sickie

Does barbie have a verb form, or is it always a noun?

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Posted: 01 April 2017 11:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Sickie has been gratefully adopted into Rightpondian,in both senses. You can be ‘on a sickie’, which may or may not be fraudulent, or you can ‘throw a sickie’, which in my experience always is.

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Posted: 01 April 2017 01:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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New to me too, and I wouldn’t have guessed the sense, but I’m not as tuned-in to the Aussie formation (being a Yank).

Additional remarks:

1) When I click on your first link I get “parameters not recognized.”

2) I can’t believe the Huskies lost!  Thank goodness I’m not a betting man, but I’m still sad.

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Posted: 01 April 2017 01:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Thanks, languagehat. 

1) Link changed to the forum menu, with thread title added.
2) All credit to the Bulldogs and their coach.  Only Gabby was gabbulous for the Huskies.

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Posted: 01 April 2017 02:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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All credit to the Bulldogs and their coach.  Only Gabby was gabbulous for the Huskies.

Agreed on both points.

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Posted: 01 April 2017 02:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Drifting back towards language, with a nod to wcbb, a neighbor—a native Mainer—just stoppd in.  She described Mississipi State’s tiny, fast Morgan William: “That girl was going like a horse afire!”

I’d never heard that one before.  Is it used elsewhere?

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Posted: 01 April 2017 02:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Sounds like a misunderstanding of “a house afire.” If so, a nice eggcorn.

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Posted: 01 April 2017 02:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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languagehat - 01 April 2017 02:32 PM

Sounds like a misunderstanding of “a house afire.” If so, a nice eggcorn.

That was my first thought.  Google suggests otherwise.  Try searching for “going like a horse afire”.

Google books has a few more, including this:

The other “horse” line is “...going like a horse-afire,” applied indiscriminately to any rapid sequence of events or actions. It has the added virtue of making some kind of sense.

It may still be an eggcorn, or have an equine life of its own.

[ Edited: 01 April 2017 03:04 PM by cuchuflete ]
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Posted: 01 April 2017 04:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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From back in the days of horse-drawn vehicles, it used to be common to speak about old fire-horses (horses that drew fire engines) who still started up at the sound of the fire alarm, mostly used in reference to the persistence of old habits. I’m wondering if this might have contributed something to the “horse afire” phrase.

And I would bet it’s only a matter of time until it starts to appear as “going like a horseifier.”

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Posted: 01 April 2017 11:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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How about “going like a hearse afire”?

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