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Is it a fishfinder or a fish finder? 
Posted: 07 April 2017 11:49 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Or does it even matter? I’ve seen it both ways, even on the websites of the guys who make them. Is there a reason to prefer one to the other?

I’m writing an article about batteries for fish finders/fishfinders and this one or two word deal is bugging me.

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Posted: 07 April 2017 12:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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The general pattern is for words to go from two-word compounds to one-word ones. Fish finder/fishfinder appears to be in the process of this shift. Be traditional and go with fish finder, or be cutting edge and go with fishfinder. You pays your money and you takes your choice.

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Posted: 07 April 2017 03:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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According to an email to a friend from a couple of weeks ago, I use fishfinder, but before checking I could have guessed either way.

Or, what Dave said (although no one ever accused me of being cutting edge).

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Posted: 08 April 2017 05:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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As a copyeditor by trade, I can tell you that the important thing is to be consistent; pick a form and stick to it!

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Posted: 08 April 2017 09:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Never mind the forms, I had to look it up just to check it actually was what I thought it to be and not some strange term for a stranger thing. Ain’t technology grand! (Although I would imagine it rather takes the whole point away from fishing.)

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Posted: 09 April 2017 06:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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(Although I would imagine it rather takes the whole point away from fishing.)

It’s a finder not a catcher :)

As something of a minimalist I don’t care for them, but they have their uses.

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Posted: 09 April 2017 11:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Bayaker - 09 April 2017 06:30 AM

(Although I would imagine it rather takes the whole point away from fishing.)

It’s a finder not a catcher :)

Yes, I gathered that but I thought much of the sport of fishing involved not just the catching of the fish but the finding of them, the time spent in waiting idly for a bite giving ample opportunity to talk or think about anything and everything under the sun, the move to another location when the present one proves unfruitful only to repeat the process. And if one goes home empty-handed it doesn’t matter in the least, you’ve still had a pleasant, relaxing and mentally-stimulating day’s fishing. But then all I know of fishing is contained between the covers of The Compleat Angler!

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Posted: 09 April 2017 01:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Even the affluent (those who can afford fish-finders [he compromised]) may find themselves in a situation where the substantiality of their dinner may depend on whether or not they catch a fish (for instance, on a camping trip or a stay at a cabin on the lake).  In such circumstances, the spiritual pleasures of the act of dangling a baited hook in water may not suffice.

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Posted: 09 April 2017 06:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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"In such circumstances, the spiritual pleasures of the act of dangling a baited hook in water may not suffice. “

The lure of fishing and the waiting with bated breath satisfies the complete angler.

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Posted: 09 April 2017 06:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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sidetrack: Is the verb ‘bate’ used in English these days outside that phrase?

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Posted: 09 April 2017 09:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Falcons bate. For a falcon to bate is to attempt to fly from a perch, or the falconer’s wrist, when restrained by a leash. I don’t have access to the OED at the moment though, so I don’t know if it’s the same word.

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Posted: 09 April 2017 10:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Syntinen Laulu - 09 April 2017 09:27 PM

Falcons bate. For a falcon to bate is to attempt to fly from a perch, or the falconer’s wrist, when restrained by a leash. I don’t have access to the OED at the moment though, so I don’t know if it’s the same word.

Bate (what a falcon does) and bate (what can happen to breath) are considered by the OED to be two different words, but they ultimately both derived from Latin roots meaning fight.

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Posted: 10 April 2017 02:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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We sometimes use the phrase “worm on tongue” to indicate that we await whatever pearls may drip from your mouth “with baited breath.”

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Posted: 10 April 2017 04:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Syntinen Laulu - 09 April 2017 09:27 PM

Falcons bate. For a falcon to bate is to attempt to fly from a perch, or the falconer’s wrist, when restrained by a leash. I don’t have access to the OED at the moment though, so I don’t know if it’s the same word.

Both are from Norman French and it’s the same Latin root, but they have different paths.

The falcon sense refers to the beating of the wings. It’s from the Old French batre (mod. French battre), and ultimately the Latin batuere. The verb to batter is from the same French root.

The bate in bated breath is a aphetic form of abate. From the Anglo-Norman abater and the same Latin root. As far as I know, it’s a fossil relic, preserved only in bated breath. The OED has some nineteenth century citations, but the entry hasn’t been updated in over a century.

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Posted: 10 April 2017 06:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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But then all I know of fishing is contained between the covers of The Compleat Angler!

You could certainly do worse. I was given a copy by a British girlfriend, and it’s a cherished treasure.

..the time spent in waiting idly for a bite giving ample opportunity to talk or think about anything and everything under the sun, the move to another location when the present one proves unfruitful only to repeat the process.

In the world of fishing, this is called “bait and wait” and it certainly has it’s appeal to many, but it isn’t the only style of fishing, and never has been, really. Many people prefer a style that is more like “hunting for fish” than sitting around and musing philosophically. Fly fishing and stream fishing are targeted fishing strategies, for example. And ocean fishing is mostly going to known fishing spots. You look for the fish, you don’t count on them to be looking for you.

Personally, I’m doing “inshore saltwater fishing” in situations where mostly the ‘finder is telling me about the nature of the bottom and helping me find the most likely *places* to fish. The best way to catch fish is to fish where the fish are and a ‘finder helps you to do that.

“Fishing” (the sport) doesn’t necessarily mean “fishing blindly,” as the word itself so often does.

And if one goes home empty-handed it doesn’t matter in the least, you’ve still had a pleasant, relaxing and mentally-stimulating day’s fishing.

This is pretty much a necessary personality trait for being a recreational fisherman, I think. Getting skunked is part of the game. It wouldn’t be a sport, if the other team didn’t win sometimes.

Here in the US, most fishing technology is driven by the bass fishing market, which includes professionals. For pro’s, fishing is a whole ‘nother deal. The guys competing for $300K per event have a different mentality. But they stimulate the whole market. There’s really nothing in the UK comparable to the bass fishing frenzy in the US.

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Posted: 10 April 2017 01:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Yes, I have a very antiquated and English image of fishing and it all has to do with riverbanks and idyllic countryside scenes and men snoozing as they hold their rods. (It’s always men, I never think of women fishing. I don’t know if that’s realistic or sexist!)

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