BL: fiscal, procurator-fiscal
Posted: 16 April 2017 05:09 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I have to watch with subtitles on

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Posted: 16 April 2017 05:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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It was reading Scottish detective novels that introduced me to that misleading (for Yanks) term.

Edit: Since it’s a Scots word, you might want to add the Scottish National Dictionary entries: procurator, fiscal.

[ Edited: 16 April 2017 05:48 AM by languagehat ]
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Posted: 16 April 2017 06:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Living in the UK one becomes aware of it very early as a result of watching the many Scottish dramas that appear on British television over the years such as Taggart, an excellent show by the way which survived 27 years, from 1983 to 2010. The origins of both words and phrase made interesting reading.

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Posted: 16 April 2017 07:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Your pattern of your subject line made me think of Bond, James Bond.

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Posted: 16 April 2017 08:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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An English variant of procurator is proctor, which has the basic meaning ‘one who represents or acts for another’, and is used in various legal, Church of England and university contexts. One of the most unusual appears on the plaque above the door of the Six Poor Travellers’ House in Rochester , a 16th-century almshouse. As the inscription on the plaque says, it was erected to provide food and lodging every night to six poor travellers, provided they were neither ‘rogues nor proctors’. Apparently a statute of Edward VI allowed lepers and bedridden people to appoint others to beg on their behalf, and these proxy beggars were technically known as proctors.

(The Six Poor Travellers fulfilled its function faithfully, exactly as its founder had prescribed - every evening the warden went down to Rochester Bridge and waited there till he had found six poor travellers needing a bed for the night - for 354 years, till in 1940 the whole area around Chatham naval dockyard was barred to casual travellers until the end of WWII.)

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Posted: 16 April 2017 10:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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An English variant of procurator is proctor

I had not realized that!  (Or, equally likely, I once knew it but forgot...)

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Posted: 16 April 2017 12:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Apparently a statute of Edward VI allowed lepers and bedridden people to appoint others to beg on their behalf, and these proxy beggars were technically known as proctors.

This man is a hard-working proctor,
A blessing to beggars in bed;
Do not confuse him with the doctor
Who fixed your behind, when it bled.

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Posted: 16 April 2017 01:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I’ve loved Ann Cleeves’ “Jimmy Perez” procedurals. Where do you get them on TV? I’ve heard that the series is on BBC but how did you get it here?

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Posted: 16 April 2017 04:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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The first three series of Shetland are on Netflix in the US. They’ve just been added in the last month.

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Posted: 17 April 2017 05:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Not seen Shetland. How’s the language? Supposedly the main tongue is serious insular Scots with a lot of Norn-borrowings.

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Posted: 17 April 2017 06:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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The language is English, with a few Scottish and insular dialect words thrown in here and there for flavor, not a serious impediment to understanding. I find the accents are quite thick though, and watch it with subtitles.

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