Chockers?  Where did it come from
Posted: 04 November 2007 03:41 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I recently used the term “chockers” meaning very full, almost overflowing.  It seems to be common usage where I live (Australia) as everyone seems to understand it.  But what is its origin?  My husband told me that his family said it came from a particular type of chocolate bar popular in the late 1940’s that was advertised as a “Choco Block - Full of Chocolate” and hence became firs the term, chockoblock, then shortened to chockers.

Is this true, or ist there another explanation.

Quaint One

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Posted: 04 November 2007 03:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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The latter.

The term “chock-a-block” goes back at least to 1840.  Orginally it was a nautical term referring to a block-and-tackle setup “...with the two blocks run close together so that they touch each other--the limit of hoisting” (OED2); later transferred senses included “jammed or crammed close together; also of a place or person, crammed with, chock-full of.” The candy-bar name was obviously chosen to play on the already existing word.

The OED2 doesn’t list “chockers” (though it does list “chocker” meaning “fed up”, possibly related) but it seems a fairly obvious slang version of “chock-full” (cf. “starkers” for “stark naked” or “stark raving mad").  “Chock-full” goes back to the 12th century.

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Posted: 04 November 2007 04:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford_’-er’

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Posted: 04 November 2007 05:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Thanks D Wilson.  Thus soccer for European football.

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Posted: 04 November 2007 09:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Footer for football, styled by the wiki above as ‘archaic’, was still in use in my schooldays in the 1950s and I wouldn’t be in the least surprised if it’s still out there somewhere, alive and healthy, if rare. Of course, I suppose archaic is a fair enough description in that case, although it does send the hairs on the back of my neck into fretful porpentine mode to hear a youthful usage so described!

[ Edited: 04 November 2007 09:56 PM by aldiboronti ]
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Posted: 05 November 2007 03:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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The more modern version of ‘footer’ (which I have heard) is ‘footie’ (in the south at least) my friends and I use ‘are you watching the footie tonight?’ all the time. ‘Soccer’ is used in the UK but very rarely now, most British footie fans stubbornly say ‘football’ and use ‘American football’ to differentiate the two - they would never use ‘football’ to refer to American football and ‘soccer’ to differentiate - in fact they get quite heated about it!

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Posted: 05 November 2007 08:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Bertie Wooster sometimes uses the term “footer bags” to refer to shorts, i.e. pants cut short to leave the lower part of the leg uncovered.  Having just confirmed that “bags” is a slang term for trousers, I suppose the expression orginally referred to shorts for playing football, and was generalized (by Bertie at least) to similar garments regardless the activity for which they’re worn.

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Posted: 05 November 2007 01:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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In my schooldays Rugby football was often referred to as “Rugger”. I hope it never sinks as low as “Ruggie”.

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