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Licensure
Posted: 01 July 2017 03:22 PM   [ Ignore ]
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The testy Dr Bello, who shot up the NYC hospital in which he had worked, bitterly complained before he shot himself that “This hospital terminated my road to a licensure to practice medicine.” I thought at first that this licensure was an American term of fairly recent vintage but OED pointed out my error,

licensure, n.

U.S.

A licensing; esp. the granting of a licence to preach.

1846 in J. E. Worcester Universal Dict. Eng. Lang. (citing Godwin). 
1870–4 R. Anderson Hist. Missions Amer. Board IV. xlii. 411 Seven young men, just graduated from the Seminary, were carefully examined for licensure.

(In sympathy with lh’s aversion to them I won’t use the quote box for OED citations unless absolutely necessary to avoid confusion. I have to confess they don’t sit easily on the eye, especially coupled with quotes from other posters. We’ll see if we can live without them for OED cites although I do think they’re still essential, suitably pared down, for quoting others.)

But back to licensure. I see OED assesses the frequency as Band 4, which also contains words such as overhang, life support, register, rewrite, nutshell, candlestick, rodeo, embouchure, insectivore, so we’re hardly talking obscure here. I guess I’ve missed it because it’s so rare in the UK.

Are you guys over there aware of it?

BTW I note in that article the same tendency in the US as here to stretch the definition of a word thus watering down its sense, usually for reasons that are financial. A family medicine doctor for instance deals only with things like coughs and sprained ankles and is in reality not a doctor at all but a nurse (and I’m sure is kept that way as long as possible), just as in the UK a teacher is in far too many cases what used to be called a teacher’s assistant, lacking the degrees of a real teacher. These ‘teachers’ are paid far less than the real thing, which is why of course the government/local authority is flooding the schools with them. Rant over (my wife Liz is a teacher and has understandably strong views about this.)

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Posted: 01 July 2017 09:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Interesting.  I am familiar with all the band four words you listed, yet had never heard licensure.

Many news reports suggest that Dr. Bello was not originally fom the U.S., yet none state his country of origin.

“According to New York State Education Department records, Bello graduated from Ross University and had a permit to practice as an international medical graduate that was issued...”

Ross University has its main campus on the island of Dominica in the Caribbean. From its website: “99% of 2014-2015 Ross graduates who passed their United States Medical Licensing Examinations® (USMLE) on the first attempt attained a residency by April 2016.”

Licensing is a better known term than licensure, at least in the wilds of coastal Maine.

[ Edited: 01 July 2017 09:59 PM by cuchuflete ]
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Posted: 02 July 2017 05:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I’ve heard licensure before. It’s a bit more formal and bureaucratic. But in this case I think the more usual term would be license, not licensing. You wouldn’t use licensing with an article: terminated my road to a licensing.

The OED entry is old and extremely short. I wouldn’t rely on it too heavily.

Here are usage citations from Merriam-Webster:

For example, if travel is required to maintain grant funding or licensure, or for auditing and revenue collection purposes.
—Carma Hassan, CNN, “California adds 4 states to travel ban for laws it says discriminate against LGBTQ community”, 23 June 2017

Easy to obtain clinical continuing education credits for certifications and licensure.
—Plain Dealer Business Staff, cleveland.com, “Companies earn special awards for leadership, training, ethics and more: Top Workplaces 2017”, 18 June 2017

For readers of this column contemplating a new home purchase, remember, the onus is on you to do your homework in advance; Illinois has few laws or licensures in place to regulate builders.
—Cathy Cunningham, chicagotribune.com, “Column: Five months later and warrantied builder issues still not resolved”, 7 June 2017

cuchuflete writes: Many news reports suggest that Dr. Bello was not originally fom the U.S., yet none state his country of origin.

Nigeria is reported as his country of origin in some reports, but he clearly was a long-time US resident and may have been born here.

It’s not unusual for Americans and Canadians to go to Caribbean medical schools—in fact that’s the primary market for these schools, students who couldn’t get into medical schools in the US and Canada. I saw lots of ads for Ross University medical school on the Toronto subway.

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Posted: 02 July 2017 06:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I also am unfamiliar with licensure.

In sympathy with lh’s aversion to them I won’t use the quote box for OED citations unless absolutely necessary to avoid confusion.

But I don’t have an aversion to them!  I use them myself for external quotes; I would use them for your OED quote, thus:

licensure, n.

U.S.

A licensing; esp. the granting of a licence to preach.

1846 in J. E. Worcester Universal Dict. Eng. Lang. (citing Godwin).
1870–4 R. Anderson Hist. Missions Amer. Board IV. xlii. 411 Seven young men, just graduated from the Seminary, were carefully examined for licensure.

Are you for some reason unable to use a quote box without quoting your entire comment?  Is it a browser thing??

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Posted: 02 July 2017 06:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I’ve never come across “licensure” either.  All the other Band 4 words cited are familiar.  How wide are these OED bands as regards frequency of occurrence?

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Posted: 02 July 2017 08:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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languagehat - 02 July 2017 06:36 AM

I also am unfamiliar with licensure.

In sympathy with lh’s aversion to them I won’t use the quote box for OED citations unless absolutely necessary to avoid confusion.

But I don’t have an aversion to them!  I use them myself for external quotes; I would use them for your OED quote, thus:

Yes, the problem is when you’re own words are placed in a quote box, like this. Then it is difficult to separate out what is quoted and what is original.

licensure, n.

U.S.

A licensing; esp. the granting of a licence to preach.

1846 in J. E. Worcester Universal Dict. Eng. Lang. (citing Godwin).
1870–4 R. Anderson Hist. Missions Amer. Board IV. xlii. 411 Seven young men, just graduated from the Seminary, were carefully examined for licensure.

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Posted: 02 July 2017 08:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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lionello - 02 July 2017 06:42 AM

How wide are these OED bands as regards frequency of occurrence?

Band # per million words % of entries in OED
8 > 1,000 0.02%
7 100 – 999 0.18%
6 10 – 99 1%
5 1 – 9.9 4%
4 0.1 – 0.99 11%
3 0.01 – 0.099 20%
2 < 0.0099 45%
1 – 18%

[Sorry, this is difficult to read. I can’t make the columns work, and the link to the OED page doesn’t work when redirected through the forum. For a clearer explanation, look on the OED site. It’s in the public pages, so no subscription required.]

[ Edited: 02 July 2017 08:25 AM by Dave Wilton ]
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Posted: 02 July 2017 10:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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FWIW, licensure did not strike me as notably rare or unusual.* In particular, one hears it a lot (in my line of work, at least) in the phrase “licensure exam(s)”.

*OTOH, the board’s (or my browser’s?) spell-checker keeps flagging it.

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Posted: 02 July 2017 11:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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1870–4 R. Anderson Hist. Missions Amer. Board IV. xlii. 411 Seven young men, just graduated from the Seminary, were carefully examined for licensure.

This is an oft told story in my Christian denomination. It is about the founding of the United Church of Christ’s Board for world Missions. We also use the word “licensure” to refer to the process of licensing of lay ministers to serve in special positions ( mostly small churches that cannot sustain a full time pastor). Technically, they can be referred to as a “licentiate” but since it’s so close to the word ‘licentious’ we normally just say “licensed minister.”

These guys at what we call the “Haystack Meeting” were being licensed to be missionaries in foreign lands, where we say in our 21st Century Conceit, “The natives got the gospel and the missionary families got the land.” See: “Castle & Cooke” and “Dole Pinneaple.”

This was one of our secret ecclesial words. I’m sorry that it has now leaked out.

[ Edited: 02 July 2017 11:19 AM by Oecolampadius ]
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Posted: 02 July 2017 10:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Thanks, Dave. Your figures are quite clear: bands go by orders of magnitude, i.e. a word in Band 4 may occur anywhere between once in a million and once in ten million words. So it’s natural that some words in a given band should seem much more familiar than others.

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Posted: 03 July 2017 06:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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LH, I think you have me confused with another poster. I rarely if ever quote the entire comment. Check my history. Show me an instant where I have done so, apart obviously from brief posts, or perhaps where it has been necessary for some reason to quote the entirety, and I can’t recall ever doing that or can indeed imagine where it would be necessary.

I can only believe that it’s my constant use of OED quote boxes, which can be long, that has led you to think this. I agree they can be cumbersome and hence my decision to stop using them. Although there we get the problem that Dave mentions, the confusion of quotes with the poster’s own words, so I may have to rethink this. All in all I think it’s probably excessive extracts from OED that may be at fault. I always like to give the board as much information from the OED as possible to benefit those who do not have access but it may be time to just cut the extract down to a reasonable length - less etymological background, fewer cites, etc. That would also remove any qualms I sometimes have about overstepping ‘fair use’.

I’ll work on this. It pains me to think I could be causing discomfort to any fellow member.

[ Edited: 03 July 2017 06:45 AM by aldiboronti ]
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Posted: 03 July 2017 07:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Aldi, look at your 28 June 2017 04:26 PM comment in the “van” thread.  Both Dave and I see a quote box around your entire comment.  You shouldn’t take it so much to heart, though; it’s not causing me physical pain or moral anguish, just a slight twitch!

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Posted: 05 July 2017 09:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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I also pointed this out in that thread.

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Posted: 07 July 2017 01:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Answered you both in the van thread. Your points were on target and have been addressed.

To get back to the topic the phrase moving van is sometimes heard in the UK to describe a removal van or lorry. Any sign of it over there?

[ Edited: 07 July 2017 01:30 AM by aldiboronti ]
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Posted: 07 July 2017 02:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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aldiboronti - 07 July 2017 01:25 AM

the phrase moving van is sometimes heard in the UK to describe a removal van or lorry. Any sign of it over there?

I believe the UK lorry is what we generally refer to in Southern Leftpondia as a semi, semi-trailer, or 18-wheeler.  If dedicated to the purpose oif transporting household goods from one location to another as part of a move, yes, moving van is the word of choice.

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Posted: 07 July 2017 04:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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It also is used in Northern Leftpondia.

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