Oriole
Posted: 28 July 2017 04:55 PM   [ Ignore ]
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This crosses over with my occasional baseball posts elsewhere on therse forums…

Oriole seems (acc to etymonline) to be something gold- related but the original European sense seems to have diisàppeared.

I’m open to instruction - what was the progression of a’little gold one’?

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Posted: 28 July 2017 07:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Like the robin, the New World oriole is named after an Old World bird that it somewhat resembles but is not closely related to.

The etymology from the OED:
< scientific Latin Oriolus, genus name (Linnaeus, Systema Naturæ (ed. 12, 1766) I. 160), after earlier use as the specific name of the golden oriole, Coracias oriolus (Linnaeus, Systema Naturæ (ed. 10, 1758) I. 107) < post-classical Latin oriolus golden oriole (a1446 in a British source; c1150, a1250 in British sources as aureolus ) < classical Latin aureolus golden (see AUREOLA n.). Compare Anglo-Norman oriol, Old French oriol, orïoel (12th cent.; compare Middle French, French loriot), Old Occitan auriol (a1173; c1150 as aureol), auriola (a1150; Occitan auriòl), Spanish oriol (1251), Catalan oriol (1460), Italian oriolo (17th cent.).

Definitions:
1. Any of various mainly tropical Old World songbirds of the genus Oriolus or the family Oriolidae, noted for the melodious song and brilliant plumage of the males; esp. the golden oriole, O. oriolus, a migratory, arboreal Eurasian oriole the male of which is yellow and black and the female mainly green.

2. Any of various New World songbirds of the genus Icterus (family Icteridae), which resemble the Oriolidae in the bright plumage of the males.

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Posted: 31 July 2017 05:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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To bring this back around, one species of New World oriole has plumage the same colors (more or less) as the coat of arms of the Calvert family, who gave us Lord Baltimore.  The arms were long (and still are) used in the iconography of the City of Baltimore and eventually, quartered with the arms of Crossland, the Maryland state flag.  This species was therefore known popularly as a “Baltimore Oriole” and “Oriole” came to be generally associated with Baltimore in much the same way that “Knickerbocker” was with New York.  The first baseball club to be called the Orioles was the Baltimore Club of 1872-1874.  Their first year they had a particularly unfortunate uniform, with mustard yellow pants, yellow and black diagonally checked stockings, and a beige shirt with the arms of Calvert emblazoned on the breast.  This was widely considered the ugliest baseball uniform ever, and arguably held this honor until the 1970s Houston Astros surpassed it.  Among the resulting nicknames, one of the more polite was the “Canaries” and this is how they often are referred to today, on those rare occasions they are mentioned.  The home town counter to this was to call them the “Orioles.” It didn’t stick for that team, but a later team in the 1880s used the name prominently, and it has been the standard name for a professional baseball team in Baltimore ever since.  There also was a race horse at about the same time with the same name.

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Posted: 31 July 2017 10:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Their first year they had a particularly unfortunate uniform, with mustard yellow pants, yellow and black diagonally checked stockings, and a beige shirt with the arms of Calvert emblazoned on the breast.  This was widely considered the ugliest baseball uniform ever, and arguably held this honor until the 1970s Houston Astros surpassed it.

Baltimore Club uniform.

1975-1986 Astros uniform. ("everyone loves the rainbow uniforms—not just Astros fans, but pretty much all baseball fans”: huh??)

MLB Power Rankings: The Late ‘70s Astros and the 10 Ugliest Uniforms of All Time. (Shockingly, they only rank the Astros as #10.)

Among the resulting nicknames, one of the more polite was the “Canaries”

OK, now you’ve got to tell us the less polite ones!

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Posted: 01 August 2017 06:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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languagehat - 31 July 2017 10:21 AM

OK, now you’ve got to tell us the less polite ones!

“We hope that Mr. Young did not select the uniforms for the Baltimore Club.  If he did his taste in costuming is not equal to Daly’s of the Grand Opera House in New York–for it was notable as the ugliest, perhaps, ever seen on a ball field.  In addition to pants which resembled in color the subdued yellow of chamois skin, was a shirt which had for a breast pocket what purported to be the arms of Lord Calvert, and which looked like a soiled spot when the men were in the field.  The tout ensemble was not pleasing; and, while in Baltimore they were soothed with such pet names as the “Canaries,” the “Calverts” and the “Lord Baltimores,” outside they were cognomened the “Mustard Trowsers,‘ the “Yellow Legs” and the “Dandelions.” However, as they seemed to repent the error of their costumes as the season advanced, and made some alterations in the same, we will be hereafter dumb.” (Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch, December 1, 1872)

“Their [the Lord Baltimore Club’s] appearance was, to say the least, stunning.  We had heard a great deal about their brilliant uniform, but in point of ugliness it triple discounts the original dress of the Chicago White Stockings, who had held the palm up to this time in that regard.  Their trousers are terrible, looking as though they had been bathed in mustard water, while the “escutcheon” so often alluded to bore an agreeable resemblance at a distance to a slab of pepper and salt.  Frank Moran inquired, after the style of his model Hamlet, “Why com’st thou in so questionable a shape?” while “Stonewall” gravely whistled “Who are these in bright array?’ The number of poor jokes and puns uttered in regard to the same would furnish a burlesque with abundant material.” (Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch May 5, 1872)

Here is a decidedly tepid defense of the uniforms from a hometown paper:

“The dress of the Baltimore nine is not critically beautiful.  It is, however, unique in its design, and its close affiliation with the coat of arms of Lord Baltimore gives it an attraction in the eyes of Marylanders which a uniform of brighter and prettier colors would fail to produce.” (Baltimore American May 13, 1872)

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Posted: 01 August 2017 07:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Those are not nearly as impolite as the ones my imagination supplied.

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