scoppy toes / scopitos / ? 
Posted: 14 August 2017 02:04 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Has anyone heard of an old game of marbles called anything like scoppy toes (Northern England) or have any idea of its origin? I can’t find anything like it on the net.

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Posted: 14 August 2017 04:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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The Scots terms are great; alas, the only one that sounds even vaguely like what you’re after is “scout.” Maybe related, though?

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Posted: 14 August 2017 04:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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From here:

In Northern England, marbles are sometimes referred to as “Taws”

That’ll be your “toes,” I’m guessing.

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Posted: 14 August 2017 05:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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It’s in Wright’s English Dialect Dictionary, vol. 5 (1905):

SCOPTOE, sb. Cum. [sko·ptō, ·tō] A large marble used by boys. (J.D.)

Under scop it has:

SCOP, v. and sb.3. Lakel. Lan. Also written skop Lakel.2 Wm. n.Lan. [skop.]

1. v. To hit, beat, strike; to fell to the ground
Lakel.2 Ah’ll skop thi thi lug. Cum. Ah up an scopt em atween t’een wih me reet neef. SARGISSON Joe Scoap (1881) 20; (J.W.O.)

2. To throw stones, &c.. so as to injure.
Cum. He’s scoppin steanns (E.W.P.).

3. sb. A smart blow. Lakel.2, n.Lan[sup]1[/sup]

Vol 6. has an extensive entry on taw, meaning marble. In use in Scotland, Ireland, England, and America. I’m not going to reproduce it here. If you’re interested the full text is on Google Books.

So, scoptoe would seem to literally be a striking-marble.

And there is skoppoloit:

SKOPPOLOIT, sb. and v. ?n.Cy. e.An. s.Cy. Also in forms skopperloit n.Cy. e.An. s.Cy.; skoppolot e.An.

1. sb. Obs. A time of idleness, play-time. ?n.Cy. BAILEY (1721). c. & s.Cy. RAY (1691). Cf. sooperloit.

2. A romp; rough, indelicate play; a game.
Nrf. MILLEr & SKERTCHLY Fenland (1878) ov/ Suf. ‘What ha made yeow sa long?’ ‘Why I ha bin havin a game a skoppoloit along i’th man Jenkins i’ th’ chatch-yahd.’ Much used in Ipswich (Hall).

3. v. To romp; to play roughly and rudely.
e.Cy. A schoolmistress chid a child for skoppoloitin (HALL.).

And there is this:

SOOPERLOIT, sb. Obs. s.Cy. Also written soopperloit. A time of idleness or relaxation; playtime; lit. ‘supper-light.’ GROSE (1790); HOLLOWAY.

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Posted: 14 August 2017 07:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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More than you’ll ever want to know about marbles, but here goes:

http://www.americantoymarbles.com/glossary.htm

TAW: noun. 1709-; origin uncertain, but see W. W. Skeat, “The Origin of Taw,” Notes & Queries, 9th S., 11 [1898], 385, and also his Etymological Dictionary [1910], who derives the term from a schoolboy’s Greek pronunciation of T or tee. See p. 6, above. Skeat admits in the Notes & Queries article that the derivation is not conclusive. The etymology given in Webster’s New International Dictionary [2d ed.] follows Skeat with a label of “Probably” Webster’s New World Dictionary of the American Language [Cleveland and New York, 1953] also follows Skeat, but with the reservation of a question mark. The listing in the American College Dictionary indicates without reservation that the term is taken from Scandinavian and is cognate with Icelandic taug “string,” “rope.") 1. The offensive marble, or the shooter. 2. The line from which players shoot at the marbles. Standard game term. -v. To shoot with a marble. Standard game term. (HARDER.) This term is more common in the United Kingdom. It’s seen in the American historic record but rarely used today in the USA.

TOLLEY: noun. A British players’ term for a shooter marble not to exceed 3/4” in diameter, as per the rules of British Marbles played at Tinsley Green by the authority of The British Marbles Board of Control.

To my ear ‘scoppytoes’ and ‘Tolleytaws’ (referring to a larger ‘shooter marble’) almost sound similar.

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Posted: 14 August 2017 09:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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TAW: noun. 1709-; origin uncertain, but see W. W. Skeat, ... who derives the term from a schoolboy’s Greek pronunciation of T or tee.

Capt. Obvious reporting in.  The name of the Greek T of course is tau, usually pronounced to rhyme with how.

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Posted: 14 August 2017 10:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Wow! I posted without hope of getting even one reply, but to get so much is brilliant. Dave’s 1905 dictionary is very helpful, but thank you all. Skop meaning to throw hard is in the Urban Dictionary.

[ Edited: 14 August 2017 10:34 AM by ElizaD ]
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