BL: hurricane
Posted: 29 August 2017 06:12 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Added this one while the topic is current

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Posted: 29 August 2017 07:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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A nit-pick. 

.....we’ve avoided the worst of it,[.....

In the circumstances perhaps it would be better to say it had avoided you, or some such wording!

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Posted: 29 August 2017 07:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Lykewyse when the deuyll greatly intendeth to feare theym, ...

Seeing this use of fear to mean “to make afraid” rather than “to be afraid of”, I looked in the OED and find that this is the original sense in English, though now largely obsolete.

I remember being exasperated many years ago when some D&D players, attempting to introduce me to the game, explained why some orcs ran away at the approach of a lich by saying “Liches fear orcs.” I guess I owe them an apology.

(Note: in Dungeons & Dragons, a lich is one of the undead, a walking corpse (if I recall correctly).)

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Posted: 30 August 2017 05:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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At one time tornadoes in the midwest (USA) were called “cyclones”. The term was still being used back in the 1940’s and ‘50’s in southwest Iowa where I grew up. Iowa State University (Ames, Iowa) athletic team’s are called the “Cyclones”.

“The (Iowa State) “Cyclones” name dates back to 1895. That year, Iowa suffered an unusually high number of devastating cyclones (as tornadoes were called at the time).” – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iowa_State_Cyclones

I see that it is in “etymology on line”, also, so it was not restricted to a certain area in the US:  http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=cyclone

[ Edited: 30 August 2017 06:47 AM by Eyehawk ]
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Posted: 30 August 2017 09:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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in Dungeons & Dragons, a lich is one of the undead, a walking corpse (if I recall correctly).

That’s fair enough: lich (also spelt lych, and the Scots and Danelaw lyke) is a near-obsolete but once commonplace term for a corpse, cognate with German Leiche. It’s still current in the compound lich-gate.

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Posted: 30 August 2017 09:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Yes, I added the note because the “walking, undead” sense is specific to the game.

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Posted: 30 August 2017 10:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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In Old English a lic is a living body, animal or human, often contrasted with the gast (spirit/ghost) or sawel (soul). If a corpse is intended, the word is modified/marked, as in dead lic.

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Posted: 31 August 2017 05:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Syntinen Laulu - 30 August 2017 09:13 AM


That’s fair enough: lich (also spelt lych, and the Scots and Danelaw lyke) is a near-obsolete but once commonplace term for a corpse, cognate with German Leiche. It’s still current in the compound lich-gate.

There’s still a lych-gate at the small parish church in Devon where I was baptised.

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