BL: cyclone
Posted: 31 August 2017 06:38 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Another meteorological term

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Posted: 31 August 2017 06:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Here is a site that lays out the different regions for the tropical storm names:
http://thevane.gawker.com/what-is-the-difference-between-a-cyclone-typhoon-and-1617803648

Growing up, I thought the different names meant different types of storms. I presume many people thought and still think that is true.

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Posted: 31 August 2017 08:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Where I have spent my days and nights since about 1968 or so, Phoenix, Salt Lake, Alaska, Nevada, it has been the names of fires that is bewildering.

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Posted: 01 September 2017 06:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Eyehawk - 31 August 2017 06:59 AM

Here is a site that lays out the different regions for the tropical storm names:
http://thevane.gawker.com/what-is-the-difference-between-a-cyclone-typhoon-and-1617803648

Growing up, I thought the different names meant different types of storms. I presume many people thought and still think that is true.

Nice link.  I thought the same thing growing up and learned the truth when I was in the Navy.

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Posted: 01 September 2017 09:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I like the old usage of meteor (meaning “any atmospheric phenomenon") in the quoted passage. This, of course, survives today in meteorology.

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Posted: 02 September 2017 01:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Interesting entry. Dave’s two weather-related entries triggered a line of Coleridge’s to pop into my head, If the bard were weatherwise that made, The grand old ballad of Sir Patrick Spens. Dave is certainly weatherwise.

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Posted: 02 September 2017 05:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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And aldi’s quote reminds me of a passage I recently read in the TLS (from Richard Smyth’s review of Alexandra Harris’s Weatherland):

It took us a surprisingly long time to notice the weather. In Anglo-Saxon literature, Harris notes, “precise evocations of weather” are rare: “Even Chaucer does not tell us much about the weather”. When we thought of the seasons, we thought not of the weather but of ourselves. We didn’t observe the weather in winter; we avoided it. [...] “Modern diarists”, she writes, “will often record the weather as a matter of course and as a background to their day. Writers of journals and letters in Stuart England said very little about it”.

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Posted: 02 September 2017 05:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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That book went completely under my radar. It looks to be right up my alley.

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Posted: 02 September 2017 11:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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It took us a surprisingly long time to notice the weather. In Anglo-Saxon literature, Harris notes, “precise evocations of weather” are rare

I haven’t read Harris’s book, so I’m not sure exactly what she said, but this conclusion sounds quite wrong to me. There are many references to the weather in Old English literature. The word hagol (hail) appears in the corpus some 130 times and even is used as the name of a rune. Forst (frost) appears some 55 times. Hrim (rime, frost) appears 22 times. Poems like The Seafarer and Beowulf routinely make mention of the weather, especially inclimate weather.

One must also take into account the nature of the literature that survives. The vast bulk of the documents are charters (deeds, wills, other legal documents), homilies, and hagiographies. These aren’t very likely to contain mentions of weather. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle only gives one-line descriptions of major political events. We have very few (I would say “none,” but there is probably something I’m not aware of) first-person accounts of any kind, the type of documents that might off-handedly mention the weather.

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Posted: 05 September 2017 11:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Dave Wilton - 02 September 2017 11:22 AM

Poems like The Seafarer and Beowulf routinely make mention of the weather, especially inclimate weather.

I believe that should be inclement weather. I mention it not to nitpick, but because inclimate seems like a potentially useful word.

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