Fast-time
Posted: 15 September 2017 06:05 AM   [ Ignore ]
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This had me bewildered.  (It’s in connection with today’s incident in London)

The Metropolitan Police Force said police “are making fast-time inquiries to establish who was responsible ...... ”

Fast-timr? As opposed to slow-time inquiries?  Is there some subtlety of jargon here or is this as idiotic as it looks?

[ Edited: 15 September 2017 06:14 AM by aldiboronti ]
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Posted: 15 September 2017 08:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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In the Army, we had something call “quick-time.” It is also (couldn’t prove it by me) another word for Daylight Savings Time because you move the clock ahead one hour. Neither of those work in that quote.

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Posted: 15 September 2017 08:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I remember quick time from the British Army. There were three speeds of marching, the slowest being the ceremonial step, foot forward then a pause and then continue the step. I never had to march like that, thank goodness. Then the normal march and then quick march which as I recall was an absolutely gruelling 180 paces per minute. This is how you march everywhere when you’re in detention in the guardroom. The distance from there to the cookhouse was about a mile there and back and doing that three times a day was punishing indeed. One of the RPs took delight in drilling us at that speed every day but fortunately he did it within sight of the RSMs house and the RSMs daughter was appalled, made a complaint and that was the end of punishment drill for a while!

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Posted: 15 September 2017 01:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I think they just didn’t speak that well, unless “quick time” is a phrase that is used in that particular government group. Here is a reference to the quote, but they use the word “urgent” in place of “quick time”. That makes more sense.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-britain-security-inquiries/uk-police-making-urgent-inquiries-to-find-who-was-behind-metro-incident-idUSKCN1BQ1ND?il=0

[ Edited: 15 September 2017 01:42 PM by Eyehawk ]
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Posted: 15 September 2017 02:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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In the US Army, quick time is 120 steps per minute (30-inch steps). Double time is 180 steps per minute. One would presume that normal marching would, therefore, be 90 steps per minute, but that’s not the case. Quick time is the normal pace. There may be a slow march for special ceremonial occasions, like at Arlington Cemetery, but I’ve never seen it and I can’t find any references to it in a quick search.

There’s also at ease march, which is quick time except that the soldiers do not keep in step with one another. And there is route step, which is the same except the soldiers may talk. There is also half-step, which uses 15-inch steps.

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Posted: 15 September 2017 02:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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You’ve jogged my memory, Dave. (It’s 50 years almost to the month since I left the Army.) Yes, it was 120 paces a minute for quick time. 180 paces was punishment marching and that’s the one that stuck in my mind as it was so damned painful to the lower legs.

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