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Found: 30 Lost English Words That May Deserve a Comeback
Posted: 20 September 2017 07:02 PM   [ Ignore ]
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http://www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/15537701._Slug_a_bed____betrump__and__merry_go_sorry____the_30_old_words_York_researchers_say_could_make_a_comeback/

Betrump will certainly make a comeback.

[ Edited: 20 September 2017 07:07 PM by Logophile ]
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Posted: 20 September 2017 09:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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"betrump” - a verb meaning to deceive or cheat

That can’t be true, can it? It is too real.

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Posted: 21 September 2017 12:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Whenever I’m confronted with a list of ‘forgotten English words’ I reckon it’s a safe bet that there will be at least one that I use in everyday speech; and in this case there are two. I might well say of some not-frank-and-open proceeding, ‘Mmm, it all sounds a bit too hugger-mugger to me’. And while hardly anyone says quacksalver these days, everyone knows its shortened form, quack.

Incidentally, pargeting is a type of external ornamental plasterwork on buildings, characteristic of North Essex and Suffolk. If your hearers know that, and have an image of what it looks like, describing a face heavily coated with layers of make-up topped with pale powder (think Barbara Cartland in old age) as pargeted is evocative and funny. Otherwise, not.

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Posted: 21 September 2017 12:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Once somebody’s dead, they’re best left to stay dead (think of M. Valdemar).  This probably applies to the words in question, too. None of those words, presumed dead, look worth reviving to me.  The hundreds of thousands of words in the living English language are more than enough, as far as I’m concerned.

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Posted: 21 September 2017 04:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I had wondered why a group of linguists was doing this. It’s not the sort of thing linguists do, then I saw:

The research was commissioned by insurance company Privilege who are now running a public vote to see which of the words should come back into everyday use.

This is a marketing promotion and the university has undoubtedly been given some quid to make it appear like a legitimate exercise.

And they’re not doing a very good job. As Syntinen Laulu points out, a quick check of the OED shows hugger-mugger still in use on both sides of the Atlantic, as is slugabed, although that one may be primarily North American nowadays. Maybe the insurance company should have paid them more.

As for betrump, yes it’s an archaic word. After The Donald won the Republican nomination, there were a few articles written about the archaic trumpery, referring to deceit and fraud, and the current sense meaning worthless objects. I’d never encountered betrump, but it’s utterly unsurprising.

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Posted: 21 September 2017 05:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Slug-a-bed is part of my active vocabulary.  It was in my passive vocabulary until my kids reached school age, with me responsible for getting them up, dressed, fed, and to school in the morning.

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Posted: 21 September 2017 05:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Forgotten by whom?  As Syntinen and Dave point out several are still in use and anyone who knows their Shakespeare or Herrick will know more of them. In the ruff of your opinions clothed from the Hand D part of Sir Thomas More for instance or Get up, sweet slug-a-bed, and see The dew bespangling herb and tree. from Herrick’s well-known Corinna’s Going A-Maying. Quacksalver and coney-catch are familiar to many too. Others, I grant them, could be described as archaic but they’re hardly lost.

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Posted: 21 September 2017 06:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I use hugger-mugger and slugabed myself.  This is a dumb list designed as clickbait for profit.

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Posted: 22 September 2017 02:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I believe that rumours of the demise of some of these words have been greatly exaggerated.

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Posted: 27 September 2017 04:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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all just trumped up....

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Posted: 04 October 2017 11:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Another list of lost words from Collins English Dictionary:

https://www.collinsdictionary.com/word-lovers-blog/new/10-lost-words-from-the-collins-english-dictionary-to-build-into-everyday-conversation,391,HCB.html

My favorite is “attic salt” meaning “refined incisive wit”.

[ Edited: 04 October 2017 11:36 AM by Eyehawk ]
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Posted: 05 October 2017 12:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Attic salt is still a common expression, from the reputation of the Ancient Athenians for wit. Grok, unless I miss my guess, is a Heinlein coinage. Blatherskite and Deipnosophist are pretty familiar terms, widechapped and whiffler I’ve seen before although they’re far from common in modern English. Impeticos I know from Shakespeare, it’s one of Feste’s made-up words in Twelfth Night. Cokes and snollygoster I’ve never heard of, pinchcommons too although the sense is easily guessed at.

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Posted: 05 October 2017 09:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Another list of lost words from Collins English Dictionary:

If one is a bibliophagist and enjoys lexiconizing words, or just enjoys the hobby of a lexiconist of obscure, obsolete and sesquipedalian words then one can peruse our wonderful English dictionaries where a prodigious lexicon of obscure words lie atrophying and sadly neglected.

It is a wonderful hobby if one enjoys the verbal legerdemain of logodaedaly, or engaging in logomachical disputes, or one just enjoys the art of deipnosophy while dining or during a preprandial compotation.

One might be labeled a snotty aristophren, or an elitist, but more than likely a sciolist, because in today‚Äôs world when one espouses grandiloquence in speech it demonstrates a rather silly affectation. 

Eyehawk, there are thousands of lost words never to be used again, being substituted by monosyllabic redundancies. There’s a lot of great contemporary literature, but the older stuff is where the challenging words repose. My opinion.

[ Edited: 06 October 2017 07:57 AM by Logophile ]
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Posted: 05 October 2017 11:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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during a preprandial libation.

I see this word libation commonly used, to denote a social drink taken together by friends. This usage indicates, to me, an inadequate acquaintance with the etymology of the word. A libation is a sacrificial drink, offered to a god: it is poured on to the god’s altar from a shallow dish called a patera. It isn’t drunk by humans.  my suggestion for a social drink taken together by friends, would be compotation --- just as good a word for showing off, and much more accurate linguistically.

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Posted: 06 October 2017 06:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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lionello - 05 October 2017 11:41 PM

my suggestion for a social drink taken together by friends, would be compotation --- just as good a word for showing off, and much more accurate linguistically.

This suggestion indicates, to me, an inadequate acquaintance with the psychology of those who refer to preprandial libations.

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Posted: 06 October 2017 08:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Lionello’s compotation reminds me that symposium‘s etymological meaning is “drinking together”.

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