Giro
Posted: 25 September 2017 04:49 AM   [ Ignore ]
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As in a giro cheque or money order. This was much used in the days before payments went completely digital.. For instance if you were unemployed you would be sent your unemployment benefit in the form of a giro which could be cashed at the Post Office. I’d never given any thought to the term but naturally enough it comes from the Italian for circulation (of money), giro. Did this have any currency in the US or Australia?

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Posted: 25 September 2017 07:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I’ve never heard of it; when I saw the thread title I thought it was a variant spelling of gyro.  What differentiates a giro cheque from an ordinary cheque?

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Posted: 25 September 2017 10:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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This American never heard of it.  I even digitally searched the script of Withnail & I and couldn’t find it in there so it’s probably not even lurking in my subconscious.

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Posted: 25 September 2017 10:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Giro cheques were a little different than ordinary cheques as they didn’t need days to clear. When a payee received the giro the payment had already been cleared by the giro centre and thus the cheque could be cashed instantly.

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Posted: 25 September 2017 11:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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This American knows it only because I lived in Spain and Portugal back when televisions were black & white, and dinosaurs stalked the earth.  I have never heard it spoken in the U.S., nor seen it in writing by an American, other than in reference to a European event.
I don’t doubt some corpus may show it, but it’s highly uncommon.

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Posted: 25 September 2017 11:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Sounds like it might be equivalent to what we call a cashier’s check.

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Posted: 25 September 2017 02:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Another American who never heard of it.  Well, to be precise I may have heard of it in the sense of seeing the phrase and wondering what the hell it meant, but it’s certainly not part of my vocabulary.  How do you say it, JEE-roh?

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Posted: 25 September 2017 05:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I’ve heard of it, but only in the context of arranging payments to and from Europe. As far as I know, it’s not used in the States.

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Posted: 26 September 2017 12:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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The pronunciation is JIE-roh, the first syllable rhyming with tie, lie, etc.

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Posted: 26 September 2017 01:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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This from OED:

Etymology: German, < Italian giro circulation (of money) A system whereby credits are transferred between banks, post offices, etc.; spec. a system operated by the British Post Office for the banking and transfer of money. Frequently attrib.

1896 P. des Essars in Hist. Banking III. ix. 384 Germany has a slight advantage arising from the fact that in that country cheques and transfers (giro accounts) are more in use than in France and Belgium.

“Giro” (sense 1, a circuit, related to gyrate) is attested as far back as 1670.

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Posted: 27 September 2017 04:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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The term was never used in Australia.

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