Smut in children’s books
Posted: 10 October 2017 07:15 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I found this article in the Guardian entertaining. Roger the Cabin Boy reminded me of a story I heard Frank Skinner tell on his radio show podcast about when he interviewed Kenny Rogers who told him he had just opened a chain of chicken joints called Kenny Rogers Roosters. Frank asked him if he knew roger was a verb in Britain. He did not. I looked this up and Frank seems to have misheard Kenny because they are actually called Kenny Rogers Roasters though this would still work if a roaster is also a person who roasts. It should be Kenny Rogers’ Roasters. Roger and rogering are archaic really and only used for humorous effect these days unless Tories in golf clubs and parliament still use them - I gave the filly a damn good rogering, don’t you know. Semantically, I don’t know if women have ever been said to roger men.

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Posted: 11 October 2017 03:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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What does this roger mean in Britain?

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Posted: 11 October 2017 04:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Faldage - 11 October 2017 03:59 AM

What does this roger mean in Britain?

“Slang meaning “penis” was popular c. 1650-c. 1870; hence the slang verb sense of “to copulate with (a woman),” attested from 1711. “

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Posted: 11 October 2017 05:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Roger and rogering are archaic really and only used for humorous effect these days unless Tories in golf clubs and parliament still use them - I gave the filly a damn good rogering, don’t you know.

Instead of damn, and being English, he could well have said ‘a jolly rogering’.

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