already
Posted: 12 October 2017 09:45 AM   [ Ignore ]
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From the ghosting thread:

For those us us who have accepted ghosting and are reading to adopt new and temprorary peeves, there is phubbing

Yes, phubbing.

In the digital age, we have a lot of terms for bad relationship behavior. There’s ghosting, haunting, and benching or breadcrumbing, just to name a few. Thanks to our iPhones and social media, it’s become easier and easier to weave in and out of one someone’s life on a whim.
Phones also offer a way to drive them crazy when you’re together. Witness the rise in a new kind of dating conflict: the kind that happens when a date or significant other can’t seem to tear their eyes away from the screen. Naturally, there’s a cutesy name for that too. Enter “phubbing”, a combination of the words “phone” and “snubbing.” It’s what your date is doing when they’re more interested in checking their fantasy football score than listening to your story, or when your partner would rather scroll endlessly through Twitter than spend time with you. It’s frustrating, and might make you want to scream: “Just put your phone down already!”

source:http://www.allure.com/story/phubbing-relationship-dating-trend

South Africans use “already” as a kind of intensifier in this way, so is this a South Africanism or is “already” used like this anywhere else? Judging by the spelling of behavior, this quote seems to have originated in the US rather than South Africa. In the UK, we would say, “Just put your phone down now!” (if I decided to stay with someone who was being so rude in my company).

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Posted: 12 October 2017 09:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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It is used in the USA all the time. It means you should have stopped what you were doing before I had to admonish you.

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Posted: 12 October 2017 12:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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"Enough already!”
“All right already!”

Very common in the U.S.

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Posted: 12 October 2017 02:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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ElizaD -

In the UK, we would say, “Just put your phone down now!”

ElizaD is to be complimented for being orderly, starting a new thread to address an interesting tangent.  I’ll just follow what seems to be a common practice here, and let the thread sprawl into neighboring territory.
The BE speaker (East Midlands) in this household says “put the phone down” to mean terminate a call.  The AE speaker says “hang up”.
Question:  Would the quoted sentence be taken to mean “End the call,” or would that require ‘put the phone down on him/her? Might one take it, as written, to mean ‘Put the physical object down’ (and stop playing computer games or reading your Twitter feed)?

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Posted: 12 October 2017 04:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Might one take it, as written, to mean ‘Put the physical object down’ (and stop playing computer games or reading your Twitter feed)?

That would be my 21st century take on that phrase.

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Posted: 12 October 2017 11:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Also known down here in the South of England, Eliza.

[ Edited: 12 October 2017 11:09 PM by aldiboronti ]
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Posted: 12 October 2017 11:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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There are several ways of asking someone to stop speaking on the phone in the UK, most of which could involve an expletive which I politely omitted.  Asking someone to put their phone down implies I don’t want to see the phone again, let alone hear a conversation to which I’m not privy. “(Please) put/turn/switch your (x) phone down/away/off / Hang x up, (will you) (please) / If you don’t stop that (x) ...” are some, but the list is by no means exhaustive. Mine is the first option that sprang to mind, but as you can see, there are others.  Plenty of them, with variations.

Thank you for the compliment.  Now back to “already”.

Already.

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Posted: 12 October 2017 11:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Really, aldi? Has already always been used like that in the south or is it recent, with maybe international influence?

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Posted: 13 October 2017 05:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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It is used in the USA all the time. It means you should have stopped what you were doing before I had to admonish you.

It is indeed used in the USA (or at least in New York City and NYC-influenced areas) all the time, but not (I’m pretty sure) with that implication/explanation, because it is (I believe) an import from Yiddish, where shoyn ‘already’ is routinely added for emphasis.  “Put it down already” is functionally equivalent to “Put it down, dammit.”

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Posted: 13 October 2017 06:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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That is exactly what I meant, language hat. I guess I was trying to be too cute with my definition. It is usually used when one is at wits’ end and punishment may ensue if the order is not complied with immediately.

That is what I thought I conveyed.

It is also used in a jocular manner amongst friends.

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