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Mad as a hatter
Posted: 24 October 2017 08:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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languagehat - 24 October 2017 05:38 AM

I have to say, this is one of the more ridiculous arguments we’ve gotten into.  And I say that as someone who loves hats (and caps)!

And, I tip my hat to that.

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Posted: 24 October 2017 02:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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FWIW Hatley, Bedfordshire, “the grove by the hill that looks like a hat”, dates as a name from around 960, and comes from Old English haett, “hat”.

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Posted: 25 October 2017 12:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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languagehat - 24 October 2017 05:38 AM

I have to say, this is one of the more ridiculous arguments we’ve gotten into.  And I say that as someone who loves hats (and caps)!

It’s all in your name

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Posted: 25 October 2017 06:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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At the risk of prolonging his “most ridiculous argument,” I will point out the following cite from the OED, hat, n.:

OE Antwerp-London Gloss. (2011) 57 Galerus uel pilleus, fellen hæt.

The Latin pilleus means “felt cap or hat,” and galerus means a “conical cap of leather, fur cap.” The OE fellen literally means “made of skins,” and may refer to felt. So the existence of felt hats goes back to antiquity, although they weren’t made with mercury until the seventeenth century.

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