Words in different languages
Posted: 27 October 2017 06:35 AM   [ Ignore ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1613
Joined  2007-01-29

While browsing for information on something else, I came across this site which offers translations in different languages for various words.  It may or may not be riddled with mistakes (I’m no expert so can’t say or even read all the scripts) but it’s ripe for discussion here (eg why would anyone?) (who are these people?) etc etc.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 October 2017 06:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Moderator
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  230
Joined  2007-02-24

I bookmarked the site and will keep it unless the experts give it a thumbs down. Thanks, Eliza.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 October 2017 10:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4491
Joined  2007-01-29

I’d unbookmark it if I were you, unless you want to use it for entertainment purposes.  I clicked on the first example page they had, love, and saw that although most of the examples were nouns, these are all verbs:

Russian люблю (lyublyu)
Bulgarian обичам
Czech milovat
Slovak milovať

Note that they give a transliteration for the Russian but not for the Bulgarian (which is obicham); why?  And Basque maite is an adjective (’beloved, dear’); the noun is maitasun and the verb maitatu.  They seem to have just randomly opened dictionaries or scraped sites and paid no attention to annoying details like part of speech.  If you want to know the word for X in language Y, Google Translate is there for you!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 October 2017 11:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  511
Joined  2007-02-13

"It’s like those French have a different word for everything!”—Steve Martin

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 October 2017 03:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  296
Joined  2007-06-14
languagehat - 27 October 2017 10:15 AM

I’d unbookmark it if I were you, unless you want to use it for entertainment purposes. 

Well said, lh.

English melancholy, noun, yields melancolía, noun, in Spanish, but melancólico, masc. adj., in Portuguese.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 October 2017 03:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Moderator
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  230
Joined  2007-02-24

OK, I zapped the link. Sorry, Eliza D.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 October 2017 08:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1613
Joined  2007-01-29

:red:

Well, I’ve learned something from this thread anyway. Smileys don’t work.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 October 2017 12:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3011
Joined  2007-01-30

Invaluable post, lh. I too would have bookmarked the link but for that.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 October 2017 12:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Moderator
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  230
Joined  2007-02-24

The old one does :)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 October 2017 02:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  296
Joined  2007-06-14
Eyehawk - 28 October 2017 12:28 PM

The old one does :)

Yes, if you scroll down the page…

Scroll-down-the-page.gif

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 October 2017 12:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1613
Joined  2007-01-29

Thanks, eyehawk!
;)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 October 2017 03:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1503
Joined  2007-02-14
languagehat - 27 October 2017 10:15 AM

I’d unbookmark it if I were you, unless you want to use it for entertainment purposes.  I clicked on the first example page they had, love, and saw that although most of the examples were nouns, these are all verbs:

Russian люблю (lyublyu)
Bulgarian обичам
Czech milovat
Slovak milovať

Note that they give a transliteration for the Russian but not for the Bulgarian (which is obicham); why?  And Basque maite is an adjective (’beloved, dear’); the noun is maitasun and the verb maitatu.  They seem to have just randomly opened dictionaries or scraped sites and paid no attention to annoying details like part of speech.  If you want to know the word for X in language Y, Google Translate is there for you!

I can’t speak for the Bulgarian but the Russian is “I love”.  The Czech and Slovak look to this eye like they might be infinitives if they are anything like Russian grammatically.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 October 2017 05:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4491
Joined  2007-01-29

I can’t speak for the Bulgarian but the Russian is “I love”.

The Bulgarian is the same.

The Czech and Slovak look to this eye like they might be infinitives if they are anything like Russian grammatically.

Yes, they are.

Profile
 
 
   
 
 
‹‹ Bum/bummer      game change-y ››