Flush with meaning
Posted: 19 November 2017 02:40 PM   [ Ignore ]
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But don’t get bogged down in it.

According to the U.N. and the Irish Times

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Posted: 20 November 2017 02:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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"We prefer the loo or the toilet, the Brits like the lavatory ...... “

Not so. Few in the UK refer to the lavatory, it’s commonly loo or toilet just as in Ireland.

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Posted: 20 November 2017 03:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I can never hear the word toilet used without remembering that it’s the etymological sister to towelette.

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Posted: 20 November 2017 04:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Syntinen Laulu - 20 November 2017 03:39 AM

I can never hear the word toilet used without remembering that it’s the etymological sister to towelette.

According to OED, this is not correct.

Toilet ultimately derives from the Latin t─ôla, meaning web.

Towelette is from Old High German dwahan, meaning wash.

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Posted: 20 November 2017 05:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Not a great article in that it makes fun of a very serious issue. You read it and it sounds like a case of UN and government bureaucracy gone wild, until you get to the end when you discover the deadly serious nature of Sanitation for All Day. The lack of proper sanitation is a major global health issue, claiming the lives of nearly a million children each year.

The article reeks with First World privilege. I know it’s supposed to be a fun hook, but when 3/4 of the article is toilet humor and the lede is buried at the end, that’s no longer a hook; that’s journalists doing a crappy job.

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Posted: 20 November 2017 07:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Towelette is from Old High German dwahan, meaning wash.

Well, blow me down. I never dreamed that it didn’t originally mean ‘(small) piece of textile’, on the grounds that ‘a piece of textile’ is what a towel is. So it’s a ‘washing thing’! Well, there you go.

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