Heart
Posted: 07 November 2007 06:30 AM   [ Ignore ]
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As in the use of a heart symbol in a phrase, as in this film title or the NY slogan. I can’t recall when the practice started but wasn’t it read and pronounced as ‘love’ originally rather than ‘heart’, which seems to be universal now. “I heart New York”, “I Heart Huckabees” just sound weird. I thought the whole point of the symbol was that it was an abbreviation for love.

Or am I wrong and has it ever been thus? And just when did it move from treetrunks to the mainstream?

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Posted: 07 November 2007 06:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I can’t remember when the first time was that I heard somebody say (sarcastically) “I heart dog head.” According to Wikipedia (usually caveats) it traces back to a logo designed by Milton Glaser in 1976, which I believe was pronounced “I love New York”.

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Posted: 07 November 2007 06:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Using & followed by # then 9829 and semi-colon works for me in preview. No clue as to Aldi’s question.
What do you see?

I ♥ New York.

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Posted: 07 November 2007 07:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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There’s this from the 22 July 1984 NY Times:

Bumper stickers proclaim, ‘’I (heart-shape) the Indianapolis Colts.”

Then a year later, there’s this from a 28 April 1985 article by Anna Quindlen in the New York Times Magazine:

Charles Gillett, who runs the Convention and Visitors Bureau, scattered big apples and ‘’I (heart) New York’’ buttons all around town.

But “I heart...” doesn’t appear as regular text in the NY Times until 1 Jan 1995:

Fanzines like “I Heart Amy Carter” and “Hey There, Barbie Girl!” are also available.

There are probably earlier examples in other pubs, but my guess is that the form dates to the early 1990s.

The film I Heart Huckabees is from 2004.

[ Edited: 07 November 2007 01:41 PM by Dave Wilton ]
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Posted: 07 November 2007 08:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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droogie - 07 November 2007 06:57 AM

Using & followed by # then 9829 and semi-colon works for me in preview. No clue as to Aldi’s question.
What do you see?


I ♥ New York.

I see “I {heavy vertical line} New York.” That’s with character encoding set to Unicode UTF-8.

What about these:
I ♡ New York.
I ♥ New York.
I ♠ my cat.

That’s very odd.  When I typed it, and when I open it for editing, I see an open heart, a filled heart, and a spade symbol, but in the “normal view” I get an x-ed box, a vertical bar, and a horizontal bar.

[ Edited: 07 November 2007 08:53 AM by Dr. Techie ]
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Posted: 07 November 2007 06:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I see an open heart, a filled heart and a spade symbol..  But to answer aldi’s original question, I remember it as always being pronounced “love” in the early days.  “Heart” became the pronunciation when its usage started wearing thin.

I have a custom made t-shirt that says “♥O NOVVM EBORACVM”

[ Edited: 07 November 2007 06:14 PM by Faldage ]
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