Vote-a-rama
Posted: 02 December 2017 02:50 AM   [ Ignore ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3024
Joined  2007-01-30

From The Hill

Democrats used the free-wheeling floor drama, known as vote-a-rama, to force Republicans to take politically tough votes even though it was clear the legislation would pass.

Known since when? Coincidentally I’ve just read Master of the Senate, part of Robert Caro’s magnificent Years of Lyndon Johnson. That is pretty exhaustive in its description of procedures in the Senate and House but I don’t recall seeing this term. Anyone know how far it goes back?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 02 December 2017 06:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4514
Joined  2007-01-29

Probably very recent.  Political slang changes as quickly as any other sort, and any pol from LBJ’s day would be utterly bewildered by the language of today’s Capitol Hill (and by much else, of course).

Profile
 
 
Posted: 02 December 2017 06:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  6323
Joined  2007-01-03

It seems to be relatively recent. The earliest citations I can find are:

Stolberg, Sheryl Gay, “Senate’s Vote-a-Rama: 80 in 3 Days,” NY Times, 27 Mar 2003, A20. “They were holed up in the Senate chamber for what they call Vote-a-Rama. Like the cherry blossoms, Vote-a-Rama, seemingly endless back-to-back votes on the budget, comes to Washington each spring, the budget season in the Senate.”

Akers, Mary Ann and Paul Kane, “In The Loop,” Washington Post, 20 Mar 2008, A13: “Vote-a-Rama Record? Senators and staff are still recovering from the record-setting blizzard of votes held last Thursday as part of the annual tradition known as ‘vote-a-rama’: the series of amendments on the budget resolution that are voted on consecutively.”

Clearly, the term was in oral use before these citations.

The OED has this for a first citation for -orama, comb. form:

1954 Amer. Speech 29 157 Audiorama, a display of acoustic instruments;..striporama, a burlesque movie.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 02 December 2017 06:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Moderator
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  250
Joined  2007-02-24

I found this on Etymology on Line, referring to “rama”, “orama” only:

panorama (n.)
1796, “a painting on a revolving cylindrical surface,” coined c. 1789 by inventor, Irish artist Robert Barker, literally “a complete view,” from pan- “all” + Greek horama “sight, spectacle, that which is seen,” from horan “to look, see,” which is possibly from PIE root *wer- (3) “perceive, watch out for.” Meaning “comprehensive survey” is 1801.

and this:

diorama (n.)
1823 as a type of picture-viewing device, from French diorama (1822), from Greek di- “through” (see dia-) + orama “that which is seen, a sight” (see panorama). Meaning “small-scale replica of a scene, etc.” is from 1902.

as well as this:

cyclorama (n.)
“picture of a landscape on the interior surface of a cylindrical space,” 1840, from cyclo- + -rama “spectacle.”

Are these different?

[ Edited: 02 December 2017 07:00 AM by Eyehawk ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 02 December 2017 07:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  6323
Joined  2007-01-03

The OED classifies them differently as they’re from the Greek root. The modern -orama suffix is related, but fully Anglicized.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 December 2017 10:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3024
Joined  2007-01-30
languagehat - 02 December 2017 06:10 AM

Probably very recent.  Political slang changes as quickly as any other sort, and any pol from LBJ’s day would be utterly bewildered by the language of today’s Capitol Hill (and by much else, of course).

I take your point although on this side the ocean Parliamentary language has a tendency to ossify rather than change quickly.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 December 2017 02:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4514
Joined  2007-01-29

I take your point although on this side the ocean Parliamentary language has a tendency to ossify rather than change quickly.

Even the slang?  I mean, of course official congressional terms hang on forever, but colorful terms like “vote-a-rama” come and go with the tides.

Profile
 
 
   
 
 
‹‹ Aye      Big ››