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OED--WOTY
Posted: 15 December 2017 01:10 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Youthquake, a word more popular in the UK

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/word-of-the-year/word-of-the-year-2017

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Posted: 16 December 2017 03:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Logophile - 15 December 2017 01:10 PM

Youthquake, a word more popular in the UK

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/word-of-the-year/word-of-the-year-2017

More popular?!  I don’t think many of us Leftpondians have ever even seen it.

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Posted: 16 December 2017 04:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I’ve never noticed it either, but as we should know by now, personal impressions on whether or not a word is in common use can be very misleading.

There are seven hits in the Corpus of Historical American English, going back to 1983, including two references to YouthQuake magazine, which evidently existed c.2000. The Corpus of Contemporary American English has twenty hits, going back to 1991. (That database starts at 1990.)

The News on the Web (NOW) Corpus has 194 hits going back to 2010. There are hits from all over the English-speaking world there, but a high concentration from New Zealand. The Oxford Dictionaries announcement mentions that the word is particularly popular among Kiwis.

That announcement also notes a first citation from 1966 in Vogue, a US magazine.

And a quibble with the title, this is the Oxford Dictionaries WOTY, not the OED WOTY. The OED and Oxford Dictionaries are not the same thing.

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Posted: 16 December 2017 06:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I’ve never noticed it either, but as we should know by now, personal impressions on whether or not a word is in common use can be very misleading.

You say that as if you were going to refute, or at least throw cold water on, Faldage’s comment, but seven hits or twenty hits over that time span is essentially equivalent to zero, and “I don’t think many of us Leftpondians have ever even seen it” is clearly true.  (Add me to the heretofore ignorant.)

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Posted: 16 December 2017 11:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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(Add me to the heretofore ignorant.)

Thanks for keeping that word alive; not used too often.

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Posted: 16 December 2017 01:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Other counts from COCA for comparison:

tiffin 115
abaya 64
otalgia 34
digerati 28
barn burner 16
puddle jumper 16
spaghettification 5
strappado 5
bardolotry 0

I’m familiar with all these words. 20 hits in COCA means the word is rare, but not vanishingly so.

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Posted: 16 December 2017 06:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Yeah, I’ve never heard of it either.

I’m sure there are plenty of current words I’ve never heard of, but in this case none of the word enthusiasts here assembled have heard ot it. It’s hard to reconcile that with the notion that youthquake is one of the words that had a major impact this year.

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Posted: 17 December 2017 02:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Dave Wilton - 16 December 2017 01:55 PM

Other counts from COCA for comparison:

tiffin 115
abaya 64
otalgia 34
digerati 28
barn burner 16
puddle jumper 16
spaghettification 5
strappado 5
bardolotry 0

I’m familiar with all these words. 20 hits in COCA means the word is rare, but not vanishingly so.

Thanks for making me feel rare, rather than obsolete and obscure.  I used barn burner yesterday to describe Bruch’s Violin Concerto to my East Midlands spouse.  I was surprised that she, a classical music fan, wasn’t familiar with the term, and wondered if it was a pondian distinction.

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Posted: 17 December 2017 04:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I don’t think the term “barnburner” is used as much as it was 50 years ago in the midwest, USA. Sportscasters used to use it quite a bit, but I can’t remember the last time I heard it.

BTW, I checked three dictionaries. One has it as “barn burner”. Another has it as “barnburner”. My dictionary app says both are correct. Merriam-Webster uses both in an article about the term:

https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/barn-burner

[ Edited: 17 December 2017 04:30 PM by Eyehawk ]
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Posted: 17 December 2017 04:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Wow, one of my fave all-time (sic) 80’s post-disco albums by the indefatigable and inexhaustable Pete Burns of Dead or Alive fame.

Sadly departed recently, this cross-dressing legend made the 1985 LP Youthquake, which I personally nicked a copy of from the CBS Warehouse where I had a temp job at the time. A pilfer I never regretted!

Unfortunately, I can’t link directly to the Youthquake LP page on Wikipedia as it involves brackets, which this forum’s outward link construction seems to have difficulties with.

I (Leftpondian) dread to hear what the latest usage of Youthquake is… ?

Edit: just had a look again at the OP. Same again then as now.

[ Edited: 17 December 2017 05:02 PM by BlackGrey ]
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Posted: 18 December 2017 05:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Searching COCA for barnburner (no space) yields another 27 hits.

COHA does not show a decline in usage in either barn burner or barnburner. It seems to be used as much now as it was in the past.

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Posted: 18 December 2017 06:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Thanks for straightening me out, Dave. I must not hear it even though it is used just as often. Just another old-age thing.

When I was quite young, I thought that it probably had something to do with getting rid of an old dilapidated barn (there were plenty of them surrounding my home town), and all the neighboring farm families would come to watch it burn down while eating, drinking, and dancing. It is what I have though since. Now I know the truth.

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Posted: 18 December 2017 09:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Searching COCA for barnburner (no space) yields another 27 hits.

I must be reading it incorrectly, I count only five.

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Posted: 18 December 2017 11:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Thanks for that MW link, Eyehawk.  I had always assumed that it was just a metaphor for something dangerously vigorous and energetic (somewhat like “like a house on fire") and had no idea it had a more specific origin.

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Posted: 18 December 2017 12:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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You are very welcome, Dr. T.

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Posted: 18 December 2017 01:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Logophile - 18 December 2017 09:07 AM

Searching COCA for barnburner (no space) yields another 27 hits.

I must be reading it incorrectly, I count only five.

COCA, the Corpus of Contemporary American English, not COHA, the Corpus of Historical American English, which has only 5.

(You can’t compare the numbers across the corpora.)

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