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HD: Wordorigins WOTY
Posted: 23 December 2017 05:34 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Here is my list

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Posted: 23 December 2017 06:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Excellent list, Dave, and much more fun since it is not simply a list created from numbers.

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Posted: 23 December 2017 06:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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"December: wildfire” needs bolding.  (And thank god the fire is finally contained—my brother lives in Goleta, just west of Santa Barbara.)

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Posted: 23 December 2017 07:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Not trying to pick on you, lh. I’m truly curious. Is “bolding” a word...yet? I’ve heard it used, but don’t see any good evidence that it is. As a commercial artist, I worked closely with type. We used the term “emboldened”, or simply “to be made bolder”.

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Posted: 23 December 2017 10:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Eyehawk - 23 December 2017 07:04 AM

Not trying to pick on you, lh. I’m truly curious. Is “bolding” a word...yet? I’ve heard it used, but don’t see any good evidence that it is. As a commercial artist, I worked closely with type. We used the term “emboldened”, or simply “to be made bolder”.

Verb
(third-person singular simple present bolds, present participle bolding, simple past and past participle bolded)

To make (a font or some text) bold.

Read more at http://www.yourdictionary.com/bold#Qxig3A4TmmRDM6KW.99

for what it may be worth, Yourdictionary.com seems to take their material from better known
dictionary sites.

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Posted: 23 December 2017 10:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Thanks, cuchuflete. I have added that site to my favorites.

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Posted: 23 December 2017 01:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Eyehawk - 23 December 2017 10:45 AM

Thanks, cuchuflete. I have added that site to my favorites.

My pleasure, Eyehawk.  I recall hearing and using bolding, and its faithful companions, underlining and italicizing,
as far back as my job stick (hand setting type) days in the 1950s and 1960s.

Bolding may be the least common of the three.

For comparison, Italicize:

verb (used with object), italicized, italicizing.
1.
to print in italic type.
2.
to underscore with a single line, as in indicating italics.
verb (used without object), italicized, italicizing.
3.
to use italics.
source: http://www.dictionary.com/browse/italicize

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Posted: 23 December 2017 02:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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It has been nearly 30 years since our company’s type department shut down due to the shift to computer type, which was performed by us artists. The company used both hand-set and Linotype equipment. None of our typesetters used the term “bolding” in all those years before the change (approx. 22 years), that I recall, and we worked in direct contact with the setters. As I stated, I have heard the term used by younger folks, but had no idea it has been around that long. It should show up in more dictionaries soon, one would think.

[ Edited: 13 January 2018 04:41 AM by Eyehawk ]
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Posted: 23 December 2017 09:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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If you search Google Books for “bolding type”, with the words in quotes, you will find a few examples from twenty-five or thirty years back.

Teleconferencing: Maximizing Human Potential - Page 274
https://books.google.com/books?id…

Robert A. Cowan - 1984 - ‎Snippet view
Bolding — Type that is produced by word processors and electronic typewriters when letters are struck many times, thereby darkening their appearance.

---------
Jamie Novak - 2007 - ‎Preview - ‎More editions
The dark letter B is for bolding type, the italics I is for italicizing, and the underlined U is for underlining. To change the size of the font (a fancy word for type or the way the letters look

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Posted: 24 December 2017 06:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Apparently our typesetters did not know the word, or simply did not want to use it. They also never used any technique to heavy up type as indicated in the definition of “bolding” done by typesetters. Making bolder type was usually done by our camera people or the artists. But I can not argue with the facts.

I just know that the first time I remember hearing “bolded”, or a form of it, was in the recent past, and the folks I have heard using it were not typesetters or anything related to one. That is the reason I don’t understand it not showing up in the dictionaries I use on line.

“yourdictionary” does an excellent job of defining it, plus a lot more. Oh, and Jamie Novak needs to find out what “font” actually means:

A set of type characters of a particular typeface design and size. Each typeface, such as Times Roman, Helvetica and Arial, is typically made available in four variations: normal weight, bold, italic and bold italic. ....... For scalable fonts, which are generated in any point size on the fly, only four fonts would be required for each typeface.
http://www.yourdictionary.com/font?direct_search_result=yes

[ Edited: 24 December 2017 08:27 AM by Eyehawk ]
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Posted: 24 December 2017 06:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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I started working in a printing/editing shop in the early ‘80s, and we talked about “bolding” then.

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Posted: 24 December 2017 09:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Nice list, and thanks for making me aware of the verb “meliorate”, synonymous with ameliorate.

Bit harsh on Simon Tam, I suppose: there should be some space for self-identification. Funnily enough, seeing that name reminded me of Firefly, which has a character called Simon Tam: Firefly was criticised for borrowing heavily from East Asian and specifically Chinese culture without having any ethnic Asian cast members.

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Posted: 25 December 2017 03:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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OP Tipping - 24 December 2017 09:49 PM

Nice list, and thanks for making me aware of the verb “meliorate”, synonymous with ameliorate.

Where did that a- come from?

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Posted: 25 December 2017 09:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Faldage - 25 December 2017 03:29 AM

OP Tipping - 24 December 2017 09:49 PM
Nice list, and thanks for making me aware of the verb “meliorate”, synonymous with ameliorate.

Where did that a- come from?

From the Old French ameillorer, to make better. But after the earlier meliorate verb.

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Posted: 25 December 2017 05:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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21ot6k.jpg

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Posted: 26 December 2017 02:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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I took Amelia out to tea,
Things to ameliorate.
It was no joke - it left me broke,
The things Amelia ate.

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