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HD: Wordorigins WOTY
Posted: 28 December 2017 08:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Never really knew much about printing but from early HTML days there always seened to be two parallel ways of marking up bold text.

One was with the html tag ‘b’ (for ‘bold’), the other is ‘strong’. Can anyone here with compositor - or html - markup skills tell me if there is a link between the two, and if so why do they both still exist alongside each other?

Happy festive wishes to all ‘n all!

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Posted: 29 December 2017 03:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Logophile - 25 December 2017 09:23 AM

Faldage - 25 December 2017 03:29 AM
OP Tipping - 24 December 2017 09:49 PM
Nice list, and thanks for making me aware of the verb “meliorate”, synonymous with ameliorate.

Where did that a- come from?

From the Old French ameillorer, to make better. But after the earlier meliorate verb.

And the French got it from the medieval Latin, but where did they get it from?

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Posted: 29 December 2017 04:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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BlackGrey - 28 December 2017 08:19 PM

Never really knew much about printing but from early HTML days there always seened to be two parallel ways of marking up bold text.

One was with the html tag ‘b’ (for ‘bold’), the other is ‘strong’. Can anyone here with compositor - or html - markup skills tell me if there is a link between the two, and if so why do they both still exist alongside each other?

Happy festive wishes to all ‘n all!

BlackGrey, at the following site there is a discussion related to your question. It appears even those in the know are not in complete agreement:

https://www.sitepoint.com/community/t/difference-between-bold-and-strong-tag-of-html/4297

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Posted: 29 December 2017 07:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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And the French got it from the medieval Latin, but where did they get it from?

Acc. to the OED, from classical Latin, melior, better, cognate with multus, more, many, and ancient Greek μάλα, very.

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Posted: 29 December 2017 07:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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I think the question was about the a- prefix.

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Posted: 29 December 2017 07:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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The Old French a- is a form of the Latin ad-.

The a- indicates an increase or addition or a bringing into a state (this last appears to be the case with ameliorate). Ad- means motion toward or inception, among other things.

The relevant OED entries are a-, prefix5 and ad-, prefix.

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Posted: 30 December 2017 03:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Thank you, Dave and lh.

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Posted: 01 January 2018 02:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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The notorious pseud, pleonast and unreadable novelist, Will Self, used the expression ‘melioristic mooing’ in a mean-spirited review worthy of LH of a Mark Kermode book and Kermode later said he had to look up melioristic though you can get close if you know what ameliorate etc mean…

1. The belief that the human condition can be improved through concerted effort.
2. The belief that there is an inherent tendency toward progress or improvement in the human condition.

The only novel of his I have read right through is The Book of Dave which has pride of place on my bookshelf next to Word Myths.

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Posted: 13 January 2018 02:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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So do we keep using this thread for the 2018 nominations? Jumos and shithole take an early lead.

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Posted: 05 September 2018 10:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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Pencil in “lodestar”.

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