Have a good one
Posted: 10 January 2018 01:49 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Just watched Woody Allen’s Wonder Wheel set in early 1950’s Coney Island. (Good but not great Allen.) One of the vendors says, Have a good one! to a customer. Anachronistic?

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Posted: 10 January 2018 03:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Yeah, I’d say so.  From a 1982 Saturday Review:

As I said, Have a nice day seems to be dying out, at least around here. What we hear increasingly often is “Have a good one,“ spoken usually by young men. “Have a good one” is flip, cool, and cryptic. “Have a nice day,” wishy-washy or not, was specific by comparison.

That matches my sense of things; I don’t remember it from before the ‘80s.

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Posted: 10 January 2018 11:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Anachronisms in films are notorious.

An interesting article by Ben Zimmer

https://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/wordroutes/the-language-of-lincoln/

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Posted: 11 January 2018 06:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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The OED has it in a citation from 1991. While it’s not inconceivable that it could it have been around in the 1950s, some forty years is a long time for such a phrase to lie under cover. 80s, certainly. 70s, maybe. 60s, probably not. 50s, no.

[ Edited: 11 January 2018 07:52 AM by Dave Wilton ]
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Posted: 11 January 2018 06:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Anachronisms in films are notorious.

Sure, but the odd thing here is that this is a Woody Allen film set in the time and place of Allen’s own youth; you’d think he’d be more likely to get it right than a random screenwriter.  If I were writing something set in the ‘60s, I wouldn’t have people exclaiming “Awesome!”

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Posted: 11 January 2018 09:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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It was used during the July 16, 1969 Apollo launch:
,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HqUXdpbtLCs#t=99

It’s usage sounded as though they knew it and used it easily.

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Posted: 11 January 2018 02:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Not having time to watch the 22 minute video, I’m guessing your ambiguous “it” refers to “awesome” and not “have a good one.” A Saturn V launch is legitimately awesome; what aldi (and I) would call anachronistic is the use of the word in contexts like this:

Pat: What do you say we stop and get a soda?

Mike: Awesome!

If I guessed wrong and somebody in the Apollo clip did say, “Have a good one,” please ignore this post.

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Posted: 11 January 2018 03:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Yes, the phrase was used right at the beginning of the video. No need to watch more than about 10 seconds before “it” was used. The guy on the ground says, “OK Neil, have a good one.” I doubt he meant “have a good day”, but he might have. I tend to think he meant “have a good flight”.

[ Edited: 11 January 2018 03:34 PM by Eyehawk ]
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Posted: 12 January 2018 06:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I’m sure he meant “have a good flight”; of course the phrase has long been used in the sense “have a good [specific experience you’re about to have].” It’s the use as a generalized formula of farewell that’s at issue here.

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Posted: 12 January 2018 07:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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I understand that, lh. But, I am pretty sure that I remember that phrase being used during that particular flight. It was like a lot of words and phrases being used by the space program during its early years. It was cool stuff back then. If it were a phrase that was used often, I doubt I would have been impressed by it.

Here is some more on it:

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/37233/history-of-have-a-good-one

I guess the question could extend to other usages of the phrase “have a good one”. When was it first used in any context?

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