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Buttocks
Posted: 15 January 2018 10:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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languagehat - 15 January 2018 07:03 AM

Argh I can’t take it any more… my copyediting brain is breaking… it’s derrière with an accent grave!!

a grave error indeed!

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Posted: 20 January 2018 07:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Everyone I’ve heard in Britain says butux. American butt was a new word to me once which I have been reminded of asking about here with excellent results.

The mnemonic for acute and grave accents is the word élève which I was told when I was 12 at school. You have to know how to pronounce it though.

[ Edited: 20 January 2018 07:30 AM by venomousbede ]
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Posted: 10 February 2018 12:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Dave Wilton - 13 January 2018 05:52 AM

Rear and rear end are quite common.

So is backside if I am not mistaken

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Posted: 10 February 2018 08:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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I hear “heinie” once and a while.

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Posted: 10 February 2018 09:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Bum, fanny, rear, caboose, hindquarters, rump, ass, back end, posterior, haunches, arse, heinie, buns, tushy, can, and for the more diplomatic expression, gluteus maximus.

I think this should bring an ‘end’ to this buttocks’ thread.

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Posted: 11 February 2018 09:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Logophile - 10 February 2018 09:31 PM

Bum, fanny, rear, caboose, hindquarters, rump, ass, back end, posterior, haunches, arse, heinie, buns, tushy, can, and for the more diplomatic expression, gluteus maximus.

I think this should bring an ‘end’ to this buttocks’ thread.

Seth MacFarlane likes to use “bum” in his TV shows. I suspect he’s an Anglophile.
Fanny, in the UK and Australia, means vagina or vulva. I wonder how that difference arose.

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Posted: 12 February 2018 05:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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It’s deserving of a more fully write-up, but the British sense of fanny is older. The American sense meaning ass (or arse) dates to 1919, and the first citation in Green’s is from a WWI soldier. My guess is that American soldiers picked it up during the war, misunderstanding the meaning.

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Posted: 13 February 2018 02:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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But an American fanny-pack is generally worn in the front.  It got its name from the original users, bicyclists, who wore in in the back.

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