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Brexit pronunciation
Posted: 18 January 2018 07:17 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I heard the lexicographer Susie Dent remark that some people say breksit and some bregsit and the same must be true of exit. After saying it to myself many times I think I incline more to egg. How about you? Is it a regional thing? The obvious answer is Bregress though most of the people who voted for that wouldn’t understand it.

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Posted: 18 January 2018 08:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I like eggs.

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Posted: 18 January 2018 10:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I’ve only ever heard Brexit pronounced /breksit/ and exit pronounced /egzit/, though various sources tell me the latter is sometimes pronounced /eksit/.

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Posted: 18 January 2018 11:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I have heard /egzit/; I’m not aware of ever having heard /Bregzit/. I would pronounce both to rhyme with ‘wrecks it’, myself.

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Posted: 19 January 2018 05:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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The OED (March 2017) lists both pronunciations:

British: /ˈbrɛksɪt/, /ˈbrɛɡzɪt/

US: /ˈbrɛɡzət/, /ˈbrɛksət/

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Posted: 03 February 2018 01:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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On today’s showing of This is Football on NBC they had a segment with Piers Morgan.  He twice clearly pronounced it /’brɛgzɪt/.  The show was about the rivalry between Arsenal and Tottenham in case there was any question about what kind of football.

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Posted: 03 February 2018 10:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I hadn’t really noticed the voiced pronunciation, but after reading this I’ve heard it quite a bit. My initial impression is that it’s those who voted for it who pronounce it this way, but testing this scientifically would mean listening to the knuckledraggers more than I’ve got the stomach for.

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Posted: 06 February 2018 09:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Never heard the softer pronunciation perhaps because, as with margarine, it isn’t summer yet.

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Posted: 07 February 2018 03:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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aldiboronti - 06 February 2018 09:09 AM

Never heard the softer pronunciation perhaps because, as with margarine, it isn’t summer yet.

I can never remember: Which is the “softer” pronunciation, voiced or unvoiced?

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Posted: 07 February 2018 11:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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"Soft” would be voiced, /gz/

“Hard” would be unvoiced, /ks/

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Posted: 07 February 2018 02:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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aldiboronti - 06 February 2018 09:09 AM

Never heard the softer pronunciation perhaps because, as with margarine, it isn’t summer yet.

OK, I’m probably missing something obvious, but could someone please explain the margarine/summer reference? Google was no help.

I’m an eggs man.

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Posted: 08 February 2018 02:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Dr. Techie - 07 February 2018 11:51 AM

“Soft" would be voiced, /gz/

“Hard" would be unvoiced, /ks/

That seems to sum up why I can’t remember which is which.  I’ll admit that the /g/ sounds more gooshy and therefore softer than the crisp /k/, but the /z/ sounds like a saw blade at work and the /s/ sounds like the air going out of a balloon.  I guess, unless it’s obvious from context, y’all’ll have to put up with my asking every time someone says ‘soft’ and ‘hard’ instead of ‘voiced’ and ‘unvoiced’.

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Posted: 08 February 2018 05:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Or people could just use ‘voiced’ and ‘unvoiced’ and avoid the problem.

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Posted: 08 February 2018 07:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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languagehat - 08 February 2018 05:45 AM

Or people could just use ‘voiced’ and ‘unvoiced’ and avoid the problem.

Eggzaggdly!

‘Sonorous’ seems a better alternative than ‘soft’ in this case anyway?

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Posted: 09 February 2018 03:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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languagehat - 08 February 2018 05:45 AM

Or people could just use ‘voiced’ and ‘unvoiced’ and avoid the problem.

That was kinda the message I was hoping would get across.

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Posted: 09 February 2018 05:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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I just had a similar discussion on Facebook over the fact that Old and Middle English textbooks never use IPA in the sections on pronunciation. Since you don’t know the author’s dialect, it’s impossible to understand how the author says you should pronounce the words.

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