The hustings
Posted: 26 January 2018 01:59 PM   [ Ignore ]
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As in the platform that politicians speak from in elections (< Old Norse hús-þing, house-assembly) I can’t see any US examples in OED. Is this term used in the States?

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Posted: 26 January 2018 02:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Yes, it is, at least among journalists and newscasters.

Big List

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Posted: 26 January 2018 06:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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aldiboronti - 26 January 2018 01:59 PM

As in the platform that politicians speak from in elections (< Old Norse hús-þing, house-assembly) I can’t see any US examples in OED. Is this term used in the States?

I haven’t heard it in quite a while, though it was often heard on radio reports of political campaigns in the 1950s and 1960s.

As I recall, the noun was never a standalone.  Rather, it was part of the phrase on the hustings.

Merriam-Webster offers this:

Definition of on the hustings

: making speeches, meeting people, etc., in order to get people’s votes : campaigning for a political office candidates who are (out) on the hustings

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Posted: 27 January 2018 03:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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It’s the platform?!  I always thought it meant ‘on the campaign trail.’

Edit:  Shoulda checked the Big List first.

[ Edited: 27 January 2018 03:17 AM by Faldage ]
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Posted: 27 January 2018 02:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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As should I have done. That Big List is like Topsy, it growed and growed!

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Posted: 27 January 2018 03:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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There is an AE expression very close to on the hustings:  on the stump.  Is this known in BE?

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Posted: 28 January 2018 06:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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There is an AE expression very close to on the hustings:  on the stump.

There is?  I’m AE, and I’m not familiar with it.

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Posted: 28 January 2018 06:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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The OED (1919) has a 1775 sense for the noun stump as a speaking platform and 1814 for on the stump. It is, of course, from using a tree stump as a platform. It’s an Americanism, but the OED has this note: “In the U.S. the word ‘does not necessarily convey a derogatory implication’ ( Cent. Dict.). In Britain, though now common, it is still felt to be somewhat undignified.”

[Addition: Safire’s Political Dictionary has a 1716 reference to a stump being used as a speaking platform, but the word isn’t being used metaphorically. It’s a literal stump. Reading it, there’s no sense that the word was a term of art this early.]

The British National Corpus (1980s–1993) has several hits for on the stump, but it appears to be much less common than in the US.

There’s also stump speech, a standard oration that a candidate repeatedly delivers on the campaign trail.

[ Edited: 28 January 2018 07:03 AM by Dave Wilton ]
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Posted: 28 January 2018 12:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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There’s also stump as a verb, meaning to campaign, electioneer, or go about making speeches in support of some cause. OED has that cited ante 1838.

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Posted: 28 January 2018 01:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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languagehat - 28 January 2018 06:48 AM

There is an AE expression very close to on the hustings:  on the stump.

There is?  I’m AE, and I’m not familiar with it.

I’m surprised you are not familiar with it.  The New Yorker magazine used (uses?) it as a section title for campaign reporting.
example: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2013/02/11/after-a-jad
It’s not obscure.  https://www.cnn.com/2017/08/14/politics/trump-campaign-rally-lawsuit/index.html
I think NPR also used it as a series title.

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Posted: 28 January 2018 05:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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I’m familiar with stump speech, of course, and as a regular reader of the New Yorker I’ve obviously seen that heading repeatedly, but I guess it never sank in because I never picked it up as a phrase the way I did on the hustings.

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Posted: 21 May 2018 11:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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On Friday, Labour was forced to cancel another hustings for parliamentary candidates in Shoreham after Labour’s national executive committee vetoed a plan by the local selection panel to drop Unite-backed Sophie Cook, who would have been Labour’s first trans women in a winnable seat.

source:https://amp.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/may/13/shami-chakrabarti-ken-livingstone-labour-party

Is this used to mean electoral campaign, or something else?

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Posted: 25 May 2018 04:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Here’s a use of ‘hustings’ as a noun meaning the place where candidates were nominated and introduced themselves to voters: At the nominations of candidates for the election in April 1853 consequent on the MP for Athlone in Ireland having been appointed Solicitor-General (MPs who took ministerial office had to stand again for election), the Cork Examiner reported that the nominations ‘took place … in the great yard attached to the Old Brewery, which was thronged nearly to suffocation by the populace of the town of Athlone and its immediate neighbourhood. The hustings provided for the occasion was one of the cooling lofts of the brewery, and its rotten floor seemed now and then on the point of giving way beneath the mass of human beings it was obliged to sustain.’ (Cork Examiner, Friday April 22 1853, p2) The ‘cooling lofts’ were normally at the top of the brewery, and were where the freshly boiled wort was pumped into wide, shallow coolers (’coolships’ in modern parlance, a calque of the German ‘Kuhlschiff’ and/or Dutch ‘koelschip’) to bring its temperature down before it could be run into the fermenting vessels: normally they were shielded with louvred windows, but it looks as if at the Athlone Old Brewery they were open, and provided a platform from which speeches could be made to people in the yard below.

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Posted: 25 May 2018 12:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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cuchuflete - 21 May 2018 11:08 AM

On Friday, Labour was forced to cancel another hustings for parliamentary candidates in Shoreham after Labour’s national executive committee vetoed a plan by the local selection panel to drop Unite-backed Sophie Cook, who would have been Labour’s first trans women in a winnable seat.

source:https://amp.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/may/13/shami-chakrabarti-ken-livingstone-labour-party

Is this used to mean electoral campaign, or something else?

It’s being used to describe an official choosing of a candidate by a parliamentary party (here Labour) for a parliamentary by-election: i.e. an election held mid-term to replace someone who died or left office before the next official general (national) elections.

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