An Adjective means “ hungry and tired “
Posted: 04 February 2018 09:11 PM   [ Ignore ]
Avatar
Rank
Total Posts:  17
Joined  2018-01-31

Hello, folks.

Just for your knowledge, my mother-tongue is Arabic.

In Arabic, we have an adjectives describes the one who is tired (exhausted) and hungry at the same time.

Does anyone know one or a compound adjective holds the same connotation?

Appreciate your help

Profile
 
 
Posted: 05 February 2018 12:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Moderator
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  780
Joined  2013-10-14

This is an entry from, The English Dialect Dictionary 1904, These are dialect words still in use or known to have been in use during the last two hundred years.

Lear/lear/leary/leariness are archaic words that mean “faint and exhausted with hunger”. Also leariness, “hunger, faintness and exhaustion due to hunger.”

I don’t know if this would help or if it is what you’re specifically looking for.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 05 February 2018 01:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Avatar
Rank
Total Posts:  17
Joined  2018-01-31
Logophile - 05 February 2018 12:01 AM

This is an entry from, The English Dialect Dictionary 1904, These are dialect words still in use or known to have been in use during the last two hundred years.


Lear/lear/leary/leariness are archaic words that mean “faint and exhausted with hunger”. Also leariness, “hunger, faintness and exhaustion due to hunger.”

I don’t know if this would help or if it is what you’re specifically looking for.

Frankly, you hit the bull’s eye, Logophile, and thanks a lot for your help
Well, if I were to describe a hardworking farmer who is about to pass out of hunger and tiredness, I would say “ He is leary, right?or am I off the track?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 05 February 2018 02:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1542
Joined  2007-02-14
Anglophile - 05 February 2018 01:02 AM

Logophile - 05 February 2018 12:01 AM
This is an entry from, The English Dialect Dictionary 1904, These are dialect words still in use or known to have been in use during the last two hundred years.


Lear/lear/leary/leariness are archaic words that mean “faint and exhausted with hunger”. Also leariness, “hunger, faintness and exhaustion due to hunger.”

I don’t know if this would help or if it is what you’re specifically looking for.

Frankly, you hit the bull’s eye, Logophile, and thanks a lot for your help
Well, if I were to describe a hardworking farmer who is about to pass out of hunger and tiredness, I would say “ He is leary, right?or am I off the track?

A problem is that it doesn’t really mean that anymore.  At least not in my dialect.  It has another meaning, related to LSD, with that spelling.  Saying it it would be indistinguishable from leery, ‘suspicious’.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 05 February 2018 05:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  6385
Joined  2007-01-03

Yeah, leary is archaic and was never widely in use. I don’t think there’s a standard English adjective that means both; you have to say “tired and hungry.”

Urban Dictionary has the portmanteau tungry, but consider the source.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 05 February 2018 07:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Moderator
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  406
Joined  2007-02-13
Dave Wilton - 05 February 2018 05:40 AM

Urban Dictionary has the portmanteau tungry, but consider the source.

I asked my 19 year old about “tungry” and he says he’s never heard of it.  I asked him because he uses “hangry” which means “in a bad mood due to being hungry”.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 06 February 2018 06:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4012
Joined  2007-02-26

Hi, Anglophile. Which Arabic word are you thinking of?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 06 February 2018 09:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Avatar
Rank
Total Posts:  17
Joined  2018-01-31

Thanks all for your clarification and help

OP Tipping - 06 February 2018 06:27 AM

Hi, Anglophile. Which Arabic word are you thinking of?

OP Tipping.
The Arabic adjective means when one is tired and hungry at the same time

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 February 2018 06:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4012
Joined  2007-02-26

Right, what I mean is, which Arabic adjective are you referring to?

Profile