It was noted that a hearth vs a hearth was noted
Posted: 11 February 2018 11:07 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hello, folks
What is the difference

1.It was noted that there was a square-shaped

hearth on the stone-paved floor

2.A square-shaped hearth was noted to be on  the stone-paved floor

I hope I have not bothered you with my questions

[ Edited: 11 February 2018 12:02 PM by Anglophile ]
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Posted: 11 February 2018 12:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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No substantive difference.

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Posted: 11 February 2018 11:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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In the case of #2, I would normally just write ‘.... was noted on the stone-paved floor’. To my mind, adding to be carries a faint implication that there was something odd or problematic about that location.

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Posted: 12 February 2018 05:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I think “was noted on” is confusing; to me, it would more likely mean “marked out on.” But “noted to be on” is odd in itself; it’s just not likely English wording.  (As is true of virtually all Anglophile’s examples; I’m not sure how helpful it is for a non-native speaker to be trying to invent sentences.)

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Posted: 17 February 2018 10:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Syntinen Laulu - 11 February 2018 11:29 PM

In the case of #2, I would normally just write ‘.... was noted on the stone-paved floor’. To my mind, adding to be carries a faint implication that there was something odd or problematic about that location.

Yeah, I see your point, Syntinen. Thanks

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Posted: 17 February 2018 10:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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languagehat - 12 February 2018 05:51 AM

I think “was noted on” is confusing; to me, it would more likely mean “marked out on.” But “noted to be on” is odd in itself; it’s just not likely English wording.  (As is true of virtually all Anglophile’s examples; I’m not sure how helpful it is for a non-native speaker to be trying to invent sentences.)

Languagegt, I am not trying to invent any new words but to see any differences could arise from differing syntactic structure. That is my whole point

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Posted: 18 February 2018 06:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I didn’t say you were trying to invent new words, I said you were trying to invent sentences.  Your sentences do not sound natural in English, so no useful conclusions can be drawn from them.  You would do better to provide examples of actual English sentences that give you trouble and ask for explanations.

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