hop the twig
Posted: 25 February 2018 06:35 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I was looking up “pipe” in my ancient Concise Oxford French Dictionary (which of course discreetly omits the vulgar sense, #2 at Wiktionary) and was startled by the list of English renderings for casser sa pipe: “to kick the bucket, to hop the twig, to die, to go west.” To hop the twig??  It’s at the Oxford Dictionaries site (https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/hop_the_twig_(or_stick) “Depart suddenly or die. ‘he takes poison and hops the twig just as True Love bursts in’”), but I’ve never encountered it.  Have you?  Is it still in ("British informal") use?

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Posted: 25 February 2018 08:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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New to me.  Here’s a little background:

http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-hop1.htm

Cassell’s Dictionary of Slang - Page 739
https://books.google.com/books?isbn…

Jonathon Green - 2005 - ‎Preview - ‎More editions
... RATTLER v. hop the rods v. see HIT THE RODS v. hop the twig v. (also jump the twig) 1 [late 18C-1900s] ( UK Und.) to run away. 2 [late 18C+] to die. hop the wag v. [mid-19C+] to play truant from school, [dial wag, to move, to go] hop to it v. see GO TO IT v. hop toy n. (also hen toy) [late 19C-1950s] 1 (drugs) a container for opium, and part of the opium LAYOUT n.4 (2). 2 in fig. use, any unnamed object ...

[ Edited: 25 February 2018 08:13 AM by cuchuflete ]
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Posted: 25 February 2018 08:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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‘E’s not pinin’! ‘E’s passed on! This parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! ‘E’s expired and gone to meet ‘is maker! ‘E’s a stiff! Bereft of life, ‘e rests in peace! If you hadn’t nailed ‘im to the perch ‘e’d be pushing up the daisies! ‘E’s ‘opped the twig! ‘E’s curled up his tootsies! ‘E’s shuffled off this mortal coil! Rung down the curtain and joined the bleedin’ choir invisibule! E’s fuckin’ snuffed it! Vis-a-vis the metabolic processes, he’s had his lot! All statements to the effect that this parrot is still a going concern are from now on inoperative! THIS is an EX-PARROT!!!

It was an old-fashioned term even in the late 1960s, but it can never die completely now until the Pythons are forgotten.

[ Edited: 25 February 2018 11:08 AM by Syntinen Laulu ]
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Posted: 25 February 2018 08:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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There was a movie with that name:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1637626/

A site called World Wide Words (don’t know how good the site is) shows a date of 1797 from a book:

http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-hop1.htm

[ Edited: 25 February 2018 09:01 AM by Eyehawk ]
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Posted: 25 February 2018 08:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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World Wide Words is an excellent and thoroughly reliable site, although the author Michael Quinion is no longer updating it.

Green’s Dictionary of Slang has the 1797 Robinson citation that Quinion cites. The phrase also appears in Grose (1796) with the sense of to run away.

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Posted: 26 February 2018 06:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I should certainly have remembered it from the parrot sketch!  I guess it just slid past me as an amusing Pythons phrase rather than an actual chunk of English.

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