How do you rate ’Curate’?
Posted: 18 March 2018 05:11 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I came across this piece in The Hedgehog Review and thought it too good not to recommend it to our group as weekend reading.  At a stretch I’m classifying this as a not-too-distant relation of Word Origins!

http://www.iasc-culture.org/THR/THR_article_2018_Spring_McClay.php

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Posted: 18 March 2018 05:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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A nice piece, but I think the author has been living under a rock. Curate hasn’t carried that sense of professionalism for some time. Blogs and social media are curated by their owners.

American Heritage, for instance, defines it as:

1. To organize and oversee (an art exhibit or film festival, for example).
2. To gather and present to the public: a blog that curates news stories.

When I looked at Merriam-Webster, it’s algorithm culled these recent examples from the web (it’s likely that you’ll get different examples when you look):

Either way, there’s no denying that Kylie knows how to curate a look.
—Sophie Saint Thomas, Allure, “The Kylie Cosmetics March Makeup Vault Has All Your Favorite Products in It,” 8 Mar. 2018

The 19 wines were chosen by Lidl’s Master of Wine Adam Lapierre, who tasted 800 bottles t0 [sic] curate the perfect variety of options.
—Olivia Harrison, refinery29.com, “This Grocery Chain Is Currently Having A Massive Wine Sale,” 7 Mar. 2018

Nike also plans to collaborate with influential women to curate events and special collections designed to fit the local lifestyles of women in New York, Paris, London, Shanghai, and other cities around the world.
—Amira Rasool, Teen Vogue, “Nike’s Debuts “Unlaced” a Sneaker Destination for Women,” 1 Mar. 2018

[I’ve moved this thread from Meta Discussion.]

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Posted: 18 March 2018 05:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I bailed out after a few paragraphs when it became clear this is just routine peeving, in this case by somebody who for some reason intensely dislikes the verb “curate.” I mean, it’s eloquent if you like that sort of “Disgusted in Tunbridge Wells” prose, but it’s just an eloquent version of “get off my lawn.”

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Posted: 18 March 2018 08:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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To the contrary, LH. He loves the word “curate”, but on his terms. That seemed the purpose of his article. It began as though it was going to be a lengthy blather, but had me laughing in the end. I agree with his sentiments. “Curator” has always been synonymous with “professional” to me, also.

But, as we continue to learn here, word’s meanings can change. That saddens some of us, especially the older we get.

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Posted: 18 March 2018 10:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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To the contrary, LH. He loves the word “curate”, but on his terms. That seemed the purpose of his article. It began as though it was going to be a lengthy blather, but had me laughing in the end.

See, that’s what I get for bailing out early!

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Posted: 18 March 2018 11:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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To be honest, LH, I almost did the same.

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Posted: 23 March 2018 06:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Actually, he seems simply confused about the word “curate.” Most of the discussion is about the verb, but the he goes off on a tangent about its having in its “historical ancestry” (as contrasted with the other kind of ancestry?) the noun, as used in the Church of England.  But of course the verb is a back formation from “curator,” which he also seems to sort of understand.  There is a long tradition of peevers peeving about back formations. (The notable exception is “to edit,” which I have never seen peeved about.  Only a hardened cynic would suspect that this is because many peevers are editors, who use the verb routinely.) That doesn’t seem to be the complaint here, but I suspect it spices the melange of etymological confusion.  So what is the complaint?  He contrasts “museum curator or wealthy collector, or the sommelier who truly knows his wines” with “enthusiastic but uncredentialed amateurs.” OK, then.  It is simply class snobbery.  A rich guy who collects art gets to be a “curator” but a mere bookshop owner does not.  Got it. 

Then there is this:  “I am all for the vitality of spontaneous linguistic creativity...” Yeah, right.

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