Come versus go
Posted: 23 April 2018 08:18 AM   [ Ignore ]
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The two women, mother and daughter, had come to a restaurant in the affluent district of South Kensington for a meeting to discuss a business venture. *(Bold emphasis my own)

The journalist is reporting an incident that occurred in a restaurant; therefore, I would think the more accurate terminology should have been, “had gone to a restaurant”, because come is used to show movement toward or in the direction of the speaker; whereas go is used to show movement away from the speaker.

Is this usage more common today than before, and is it considered standard?

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Posted: 23 April 2018 09:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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It depends on context, surely. If the writer is describing (or about to describe) what took place at that venue and that meeting, then it seems to me perfectly natural to say they had come there rather than gone there.

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Posted: 23 April 2018 02:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Just so.  If the focus of the narrative was what had occurred at home while they were away, had gone would be preferable, if it’s what happened at the restaurant or as a result of their visit, had come is the natural and sensible choice.

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Posted: 23 April 2018 04:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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It depends on context, surely. If the writer is describing (or about to describe) what took place at that venue and that meeting, then it seems to me perfectly natural to say they had come there rather than gone there.

The sentence I submitted came from an article I had read. The journalist is describing an incident that had occurred in a restaurant; he was not at the restaurant and he was describing what had occurred in the past. I should have clarified that. Nevertheless, I don’t understand why you would think that it would seem more natural to say, they had come, rather than, they had gone, when the movement is away from the speaker. After all, it would seem a little unorthodox, at least to me, if one were asked where he/she went yesterday and the person responded, I came to a restaurant. It would seem more natural to say, I went to a restaurant past participle I had gone to a restaurant.

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Posted: 24 April 2018 02:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Since we don’t know the location of the “speaker” (or, in this case, the reporter) relative to the home of the two women the speaker’s location is irrelevant.  I’m with SL and Dr. T here.

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Posted: 24 April 2018 04:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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The actual location of the writer is irrelevant. The writer is establishing a figurative position in the restaurant for the sake of creating a unity of location in the narrative. She is saying had come and then unfolding the events that transpired there. Using went, while hardly incorrect, would be the construction that strikes the discordant note, as it creates another location that is irrelevant to the story. We don’t care where the women came from; that’s an irrelevant detail to the story. So I’m with the others here too.

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Posted: 24 April 2018 08:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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The actual location of the writer is irrelevant. The writer is establishing a figurative position in the restaurant for the sake of creating a unity of location in the narrative.

That makes sense and I agree, but I guess personally, had come, strikes a discordant note, and it would not be my choice of sentence construction. Either form is correct, as explained in the link below, but one seems to be less ambiguous, at least for me.

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/grammar/british-grammar/come-or-go

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