Objective case
Posted: 11 May 2018 10:11 PM   [ Ignore ]
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The superlative writer P.D.James wrote: “And those two deaths bound you and she together indissolubly for life."( P.D. James, 1971 Shroud for a nightingale.”

She used the subjective case pronoun she , which I find more esthetically pleasing, rather than the standard objective case.  I was interested in knowing whether a copy editor would modify such a grammatical construction or allow the author to make that decision. I understand that many writers get into contentious disagreements with editors who want to alter their words or what might be an unorthodox grammatical punctilio. Also, the copy editor could have been remiss in performing his task, which seems unlikely.

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Posted: 12 May 2018 01:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Is this quote taken from someone’s speech?

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Posted: 12 May 2018 09:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Faldage - 12 May 2018 01:59 AM

Is this quote taken from someone’s speech?

It’s dialogue from the book, and I understand that an author when writing dialogue the characters don’t necessarily follow the rules of grammar. I was interested, however, in whether a copy editor would modify the grammar in dialogue, depending on the characters, or is he/she more punctilious with expository and descriptive writing.

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Posted: 12 May 2018 12:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Wouldn’t the copy editor simply read on to see if this only pertained to the conversations, but not the narrative? And if that didn’t work, contact the writer, if possible? I can not imagine editing it without knowing what the thinking of the writer was. There is a chance the writer doesn’t know the preferences, and would be perfectly happy if the editor made the changes seen fit.

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Posted: 13 May 2018 12:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Any copy editor worth her salt is in conversation with the writer she is editing. And ultimately, the author, especially a noted one like P.D. James, would approve any changes the copy editor suggests. Plus, it’s dialogue, so the standard grammar rules might not necessarily apply. At most, a good copy editor would flag it and ask the author if she intended the non-standard grammar.

That’s how it should work, at least for fiction. Things are different in the magazine and newspaper world, where the copy editors enforce the house style and the writers don’t usually have the power to overrule the copy editor.

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Posted: 14 May 2018 10:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I find the construction puzzling, even if it’s supposed to be dialogue. I’d have thought it was the sort of thing that one sees often enough in unedited writing, but never hears, particularly on the lips of someone who says ‘indissolubly’. But I don’t hear everything that’s said, obviously.

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