Hogmanay
Posted: 21 November 2018 09:54 AM   [ Ignore ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  388
Joined  2007-02-13

Hogmanay:  I new favorite word.  I learned it reading the marvelous Diary of a Bookseller by Shaun Bythell.  It is the Scottish version of New Years Eve.  MW Online says its etymology is unknown.  Wikipedia is only to happy to offer baseless speculations.  (In fairness, it doesn’t pretend they aren’t anything other than baseless speculations, which puts this article above many others.)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 November 2018 11:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  551
Joined  2007-02-13

Whenever I see “Hogmanay” I think of Terry Pratchett’s novel “Hogfather” where the equivalent Discworld holiday to our Christmas is Hogswatch.  It was when I was reading the novel the first time, about twenty years ago, that I found out about “Hogmanay”.

Edit:  Cant seem to get this link to work:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Discworld_(world)#Hogswatchnight

[ Edited: 21 November 2018 11:39 AM by donkeyhotay ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 November 2018 05:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  6713
Joined  2007-01-03

The OED (2010) says it’s probably a 14th century borrowing from the French auguilanleu, haguimenlo, aguillanneuf. The initial element is unknown, but the ending is probably from le an neuf (the new year).

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 November 2018 02:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  313
Joined  2007-02-15
Dave Wilton - 21 November 2018 05:16 PM

The OED (2010) says it’s probably a 14th century borrowing from the French auguilanleu, haguimenlo, aguillanneuf. The initial element is unknown, but the ending is probably from le an neuf (the new year).

Another classic remnant of the old Franco-Scots alliance in the period 1300-1600 (mainly v the English) which also left us tassie (cup), to fash yourself (to worry) and ashet (plate).

Brief historical overview of the Scots language

INSIDER’S TIP: Impress Scottish friends around the world by pronouncing it as the Scots do: HUGMI’NAY (hug as in pug, ‘ preceds stressed syllable). Do it this festive season for immediate results!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 November 2018 05:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4702
Joined  2007-01-29

Impress Scottish friends around the world by pronouncing it as the Scots do: HUGMI’NAY (hug as in pug, ‘ preceds stressed syllable).

As some Scots do, anyway.  The stress can be on the first or last syllable, or both; the first vowel can be as in “hog,” “hug,” or “hoe,” and the first syllable can even be “hang,” depending on where you live.  The online DSL only has [hɔgmə′ne:] (hog-mə-NAY), but my hard-copy Concise Scots Dictionary has all the variants I mention.  The DSL also has a good etymology:

[O.Sc. hagmonay, = 2., from 1604. The orig. of the word has been much disputed but the only satisfactory etym. is the derivation from North. Fr. dial. hoginane, with variants hoginono, hoguinettes, etc. from 16th c. Fr. aguillanneuf, a gift given at the New Year, a children’s cry for such a gift, New Year’s Eve, the second element of which appears to be l’an neuf, the New Year. Agui- is obscure (not < au gui). A similar development is found in Sp. aguinaldo, id. In Scot. the word is prob. due to the French Alliance and had been borrowed a.1560.]

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 November 2018 09:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4139
Joined  2007-02-26

Looks like dyslexic wood

Profile
 
 
Posted: 01 January 2019 01:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  6713
Joined  2007-01-03

Added to the Big List

Profile
 
 
   
 
 
‹‹ fissiparous      ye ››