Says
Posted: 03 February 2019 03:22 AM   [ Ignore ]
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99.92% of the time when I hear the word says, it is pronounced /sez/. That’s how I say it, that’s how everyone I know says it.

But every now and then I’ll hear a British person on screen pronounce it to rhyme with pays, /seız/.
Is this a regional variant in England, or a personal quirk? Or something else?

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Posted: 04 February 2019 07:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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OP Tipping - 03 February 2019 03:22 AM

99.92% of the time when I hear the word says, it is pronounced /sez/. That’s how I say it, that’s how everyone I know says it.

But every now and then I’ll hear a British person on screen pronounce it to rhyme with pays, /seız/.
Is this a regional variant in England, or a personal quirk? Or something else?

I presume you mean /sɛz/ with your first pronunciation?

The /se:ɪz/ version is a second option for me as a Southern Scottish native English speaker. Even without the diphthong, just /se:z/ but I’m damned if I know when I would use one and not the other! Possibly to convey emphasis on the word (’he says he’s going to do it’ expressing doubt as to whether something will ever actually happen despite ‘him’ saying it will) but I couldn’t stand in court and swear that.

Mind you, I have been away from daily life in Scotland for a long time now so that further lessens any value you can take from my comments.

But it is familiar as a pronunciation.

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Posted: 11 February 2019 08:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I knew a lecturer at university who used that pronunciation, although in other respects his pronunciation was that of someone who had acquired RP deliberately at some point. He came from Rochdale.

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Posted: 11 February 2019 06:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I know a couple who are both from Northumberland(though they’ve been in Texas for forty years) The wife pronounces says as described by OP. The husband does not normally, but gets close to it if he has recently been on the phone with relatives in England. They both have what I think of as “northern” English accents, as taught to me by such PBS and BBC America shows as George Gently, Vera, and Dalziel and Pascoe.

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Posted: 15 February 2019 11:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Says rhyming with plays is chalk squeaking on a blackboard to my ears, right up there with haitch. I’m not sure that there’s anything regional about it but it does appear to be confined to the UK, as indeed seems to be the case with haitch.

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Posted: 16 February 2019 06:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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confined to the UK, as indeed seems to be the case with haitch.

Are you conferring UK citizenship on all Irish people everywhere?

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