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jaguar
Posted: 22 February 2019 06:54 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I have heard two different pronunciations of jaguar in British form. Do they come from different areas in the UK or are they generally throughout? And when did the pronunciation change in the USA?

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/jaguar
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/jaguar

I was inspired by the car ads.

[ Edited: 22 February 2019 06:58 AM by Eyehawk ]
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Posted: 22 February 2019 04:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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The Merriam-Webster link sounds like it is using the same American speaker(or American-speaking computer) to render both pronunciations, so their British pronunciation doesn’t sound like “real” British to my ears.

The Oxford link sounds like the genuine Brit pronunciation.

I can’t help you with the change in the American pronunciation. I wasn’t aware that there ever was a change.

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Posted: 22 February 2019 04:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Eyehawk - 22 February 2019 06:54 AM

And when did the pronunciation change in the USA?

I first noticed the British pronunciation “JAG-yoo-wuh” (as opposed to “JAG-wahr") on New York radio commercials sometime in the mid-to-late 2000’s.  Not sure if that was just the local dealer’s idea, but Jaguar USA seems to be using that pronunciation in all their advertising now.  I think the wider use of the British pronunciation came with the “British Villains” campaign that started in 2015, but I can’t prove it.

edit: adding link to Adweek article about the British Villains campaign
https://www.adweek.com/brand-marketing/how-jaguar-rekindling-its-coolness-embracing-its-sleek-british-roots-167466/

[ Edited: 22 February 2019 04:10 PM by jtab4994 ]
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Posted: 23 February 2019 12:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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The only pronunciation of the word I had ever heard before today is the three-syllable one given by the Oxford dictionary. Of course it gets filtered through various regional British accents but that’s essentially the way we all say it over here.

And yes, the M-W’s attempt at the British pronunciation is unrealistic. Being non-rhotic, no English person would sound a terminal R unless immediately followed by a vowel (and in fact we routinely insert an R between a terminal vowel and an opening one, so that hardly counts as ‘sounding the R in jaguar‘. And I don’t think I’ve ever heard even a Scot say ‘jaguaR’, though I’d be interested to have the opinions of any Scots here.

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Posted: 23 February 2019 02:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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And when did the pronunciation change in the USA?

I don’t think it is a panoptic change. I think what initiated the change was the aggressive Jaguar ad campaigns that decided to use the British non-rhotic pronunciation to lend more authenticity and élan to the vehicle’s heritage. Many Americans employed the British pronunciation more as an affectation or thinking it was the correct pronunciation.

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Posted: 23 February 2019 02:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Apropos:

https://www.thoughtco.com/rhoticity-speech-4065992

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Posted: 24 February 2019 07:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I figured that the M-W pronunciation was wrong, but wasn’t sure. One would think it is time they change it.

Re the American pronunciation, I was speaking of the “JAG-wahr” one, as opposed to the British style, which is the only one I have heard in the USA to this point in my life. It is certainly interesting that some American’s are now saying it British style now. I have not heard that yet, but look forward to it.

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Posted: 24 February 2019 03:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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It’s a bit of a conundrum for me, as an American.  I, like almost all Americans, have always used the “jag-wahr” pronunciation, which is pretty close to the Portuguese from which it came.  This certainly seems natural when speaking of the big cat.  However, the “jag-yoo-wahr” automobile is British.  So when I’m speaking about the car, is it more proper to use the British pronunciation?

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Posted: 24 February 2019 08:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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You have the right to call it whatever you want. I prefer “jag-wahr” because that was all I knew until I heard somebody from the other side of the pond pronounce it differently.

[ Edited: 24 February 2019 09:07 PM by Eyehawk ]
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Posted: 25 February 2019 06:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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So when I’m speaking about the car, is it more proper to use the British pronunciation?

No, because it’s just a special use of the animal name, not a completely different word with its own pronunciation.  (And apart from that, of course Eyehawk is correct that you have the right to call it whatever you want.) I would never dream of calling the car a “Jag-yoo-ah”; it would feel like a pointless and irritating imitation of a foreign accent.

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Posted: 25 February 2019 09:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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OTOH Renault went by “Ren-nawlt” in the US until the early 1980’s. By the time I bought my Renault Alliance in 1984 (Renault 9 in Europe and elsewhere) even I was pronouncing it the French way. So who’s to say we won’t all be saying “Jaguar” like British villains in a few years?

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Posted: 26 February 2019 06:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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The difference, of course, being that Renault is a French name, so it makes sense to pronounce it the French way (though there’s nothing at all wrong with using an Anglicized version).

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Posted: 26 February 2019 09:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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The difference, of course, being that Renault is a French name, so it makes sense to pronounce it the French way…

Which would mostly apply to perhaps only a dozen people who actually own a Renault vehicle in the USA.

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Posted: 28 February 2019 07:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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When I taught Japanese people I was surprised to learn that most had heard of Jaguar and that they pronounce it ‘jagger’. None had heard of Bentley, the Rolls-Royce of luxury British saloons.

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Posted: 02 March 2019 03:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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donkeyhotay - 24 February 2019 03:06 PM

It’s a bit of a conundrum for me, as an American.  I, like almost all Americans, have always used the “jag-wahr” pronunciation, which is pretty close to the Portuguese from which it came.  This certainly seems natural when speaking of the big cat.  However, the “jag-yoo-wahr” automobile is British.  So when I’m speaking about the car, is it more proper to use the British pronunciation?

I don’t remember ever hearing anything but a trisyllabic pronunciation when I was growing up in the States, though my memory may be faulty. It wouldn’t have been a word I’d have had much occasion to hear or use in any case.

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Posted: 04 March 2019 05:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Syntinen Laulu - 23 February 2019 12:31 AM

And I don’t think I’ve ever heard even a Scot say ‘jaguaR’, though I’d be interested to have the opinions of any Scots here.

As the main Scot on duty here, my pronunciation of these cars goes back to playing with the dinky toy versions, and would be:

/’dzagjuir/

Where, thanks to lack of phonetic symbols to hand, ‘dz’=j in ‘jag’, and ‘i’ = the English schwa, or unstressed e. The final ‘r’ would have a hint of rhoticity about it. Certainly not the long ‘aah’ ending I would expect in S England at least.

Dunno if that helps?

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