giddyap/giddy-up
Posted: 14 April 2019 07:32 AM   [ Ignore ]
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“giddyap” is the spelling from a crossword puzzle I just completed. I had only known it as “giddy-up” from old cowboy movies here in the U.S.A. before today.

Merriam-Webster has “giddap” circa 1897.
Oxford Living Dictionaries has “giddy-up” origin in 1920 (originally US as giddap).
Online Etymology Dictionary has “giddy-up” from 1909, from “giddap” (1867)

Obviously, there is no meeting of the minds re this one. Is there anything more concrete available?

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Posted: 14 April 2019 08:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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The OED (entry dated 1972) has it as giddap, and offers giddy-ap, giddy-up as variants.  The first citation is dated 1925. Three of the citations are from the USA; one is from the Manchester Guardian Weekly, but as it says “He harnessed the brawling Pennsylvanians and with a twinkling ‘giddy up’ drove them into the Eisenhower camp”, I assume that the writer was deliberately using an American expression; one is from a New Zealand novel.

I associate it with the cowboy films of my youth; I certainly don’t think of it as a Rightpondian expression at all.

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Posted: 15 April 2019 04:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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This is probably obvious, but just to make it explicit, it is, in the words of the OED, a colloquial pronunciation of get up.

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Posted: 15 April 2019 07:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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languagehat - 15 April 2019 04:56 AM

This is probably obvious, but just to make it explicit, it is, in the words of the OED, a colloquial pronunciation of get up.

I’m sure some folks somewhere say something like giddyup, but in real life I’ve never heard anyone use a three-syllable version. Giddap is more like it, and I say it more like git-up(though I haven’t been on a horse in years)

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Posted: 16 April 2019 10:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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FWIW, giddy up, with 3 distinct syllables, is the only version I can recall ever hearing, whether IRL or in a TV or movie. It is of course possible I heard “giddap” or something similar and my brain auto-corrected it to “giddy up”, and then I promptly forgot it, but giddy up is the most common form of this by far in my neck of the woods.

I should also perhaps mention that I never ride horses and have no idea if I would say it or something similar if for some reason I actually rode one.  It is more a word I associate with The Old West, and movies/shows/books/etc. re: that genre, than with anything in my actual, modern life. Though it is also common to use it in a figurative way.

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Posted: 16 April 2019 12:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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My experience is the same as Svinyard’s.

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