based off of
Posted: 11 July 2019 09:56 AM   [ Ignore ]
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In my students’ (mostly 18-20-year-olds)writing, I have found an almost universal tendency to write based off of instead of based on. I have been correcting this, but I’m wondering, since it’s nearly universal among them, if this is an example of the language changing and something that I shouldn’t bother with. (Preposition usage is a particularly fluid aspect of language.)

What say you all?

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Posted: 11 July 2019 05:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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That is so interesting. Of course, I do not know the answer, but it sure shows signs of a change in what may be totaly acceptable at some point in the near future. It feels like I should pour a glass of wine and celebrate the wonders of it all. I’m beginning to understand the fluidity of language more than I ever understood berfore I found this site. I’m living in a wonderous world of words, and loving every minite of it.

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Posted: 11 July 2019 11:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Odd as it sounds, I can see some logic to it. As long as you conceive of a base as a solid foundation, that you can place something securely on, you will find it natural to say based on.

But if you grew up hearing it more often used in airbase, moon base, military base and the like, you might well think of a base more as a jumping-off point, and find it natural to say based off.

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Posted: 12 July 2019 12:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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FWIW, I think it is reasonable to correct it, not because I see “based off of” as an error that must be corrected, but because I think “based on” is in a more appropriate register for formal and semi-formal writing.

No twenty-something I, but I see “based off of” as completely idiomatic and standard, at least in casual speech.  But in the context of an essay, school paper, or other formal writing, I think “based on” is probably better, unless there is some reason why it makes sense to go with “based off of” in a given situation (that is, even in a very formal written document, there are times when it makes sense, for one reason or another, to opt for a more casual register).

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Posted: 12 July 2019 01:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I have restrained myself for years regarding the superfluous of.  Well over a half century ago we were taught to use the
apositive.  “The management consulting firm, McKinsey & Co.”

I noticed, back around 1978, that the popular press had a different and annoying way of expressing this: The management consulting firm of McKinsey & Co.”

That minor nuisance was small potatoes compared to How big of a deal…

The ofs have crept into many a nook and cranny of popular and even semi-formal writing and speech.
This is a battle I lost long ago.  Howling at the moon will do nothing to arrest the spread of superfluous ofs.

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Posted: 13 July 2019 01:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I mean, is this the only context in which they are using “off of”? I was given to understand it is common in American English.

edit: For comparison, in Australian English, “based off” is a moderately common variant of “based on”.

e.g.
https://www.carnarvon.wa.gov.au/Community/Youth/What-We-Do
The aim of Carnarvon Youth Service is to deliver a positive youth development model based off the procedures by providing a platform…

[ Edited: 13 July 2019 02:07 AM by OP Tipping ]
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Posted: 15 July 2019 12:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I seem to recall that Sir Talbot Buxomly MP “dined hugely [I]off of[/I] servants” before he went to meet Prince George in Dish & Dishonesty (episode 1 of Blackadder III).

I think if I hear a fellow American say “based off of” then I’d consider it an informal use, or a class/education marker if used in a formal setting.  I mean, one can imagine certain US Presidents saying “based on” and others tweeting “based off of”.

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Posted: 19 July 2019 01:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I knew a Londoner of my own age in 1980 who would often use it eg ‘’I got it off of a mate,’’ ‘’They got their guitar sound off of Dave Davies and early Beck.’’ He was a middle-class student not a barrow boy or costermonger!

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Posted: 19 July 2019 02:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I believe that “based off of” will become acceptable unless school teachers and Engish professors decide to go to war over it. As it stands now, the teachers and professors aren’t gaining. I agree that it should be as you like it, Dave, but you are probably behind in this battle.

[ Edited: 21 July 2019 05:16 AM by Eyehawk ]
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Posted: 19 July 2019 04:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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I don’t care either way. I just want to be sure I’m teaching them how to write in a manner that will be generally accepted. I’m not trying to be the language police.

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Posted: 21 July 2019 09:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Dave Wilton - 11 July 2019 09:56 AM

In my students’ (mostly 18-20-year-olds)writing, I have found an almost universal tendency to write based off of instead of based on. I have been correcting this, but I’m wondering, since it’s nearly universal among them, if this is an example of the language changing and something that I shouldn’t bother with. (Preposition usage is a particularly fluid aspect of language.)

What say you all?

Also another alternative structure, and viewpoint, from based on, which I found on Language Lore.

Change in Grammar as a Change in Conceptual Structure (“based on” vs. “based around”)
April 9, 2019

For some time now in the recent history of American English, people have been saying “based around” instead of the traditionally normative “based on.” This phrase can be heard almost daily on the media, uttered by speakers who seem to be in their twenties and thirties. Why this change in grammar?

Apparently, these speakers conceive of the passive mode of the verb base as denoting some sort of peripherality rather than the centrality/fundamentality commonly associated heretofore with this word. The latter, after all, means (according to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary Online) ‘the fundamental part of something; basic principle; essence, foundation, basis, groundwork’. The foundation of something is as central as one can get in the conceptual universe, is it not?

The shift in current speech must therefore be based on (take my grammar advisedly!) a reconceptualization of the verb. In the thinking of millennials et al., apparently resting on a foundation is conceived of as something tangential rather than central, i. e., covering the periphery of anything rested on (= its base), not on its core or center.

MICHAEL SHAPIRO

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